Palace of Care – Farewell to Perlin Soong

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Pearl of the orient photo by Dave Francis on Unsplash

Pearls are formed by oysters when they try to wall off something that irritates them. The irritant gets covered in layers of a substance called nacre (mother/parent of pearl) and can become something beautiful of high value. This process is explained well here.

Some patients are truly a pleasure to look after. Some will find their way through your protective shell and into your heart. I was granted permission to broadcast the following story by Perlin Soong and his parents as he hoped that it would help others in similar situations.

I’d heard about Perlin months before I actually met him. He was described as a remarkable 32 year old man who had advanced metastatic cancer. He’d received many treatments and had come close to dying a number of times in the past year. His oncologist arranged for me to meet Perlin in hospice outpatient clinic as he had questions to ask about the end of his life, which he was likely approaching.

Perlin attended clinic with his parents, having recently completed whole brain radiotherapy for brain metastases. At the time he felt relatively well but knew that things could worsen at any time. Thus he tried to make the most of each day, e.g. He had recently fine-dined at one of Auckland’s best restaurants with a fellow foodie friend – had bivalves been on the menu? 

Perlin had been distressed by severe headaches, nerve-related leg pains, breathlessness and panic attacks. We explained that we could usually control such symptoms well and on the rare occasions that we couldn’t, Palliative Sedation therapy could be offered. This final resort therapy would make him less aware of his symptoms, and usually out of the hundreds of cases that we dealt with each year, only two or three of them required sedation. This conversation reassured Perlin.

Perlin recounted having being surprised that a work colleague became his chemotherapy buddy, as they were both being treated at the same time for advanced cancers. He talked sadly about how his friend had deteriorated rapidly and that his death had been upsetting, but had spurred Perlin into completing his own Advance Care Plan (ACP.) Perlin’s preference of places to die were, in descending order; at home if possible, hospice and hospital only if it couldn’t be avoided. As long as he could be kept comfortable without too much distress for his parents he would be “okay.”

Perlin worried about having seizures or stroke-like events. His mother had been affected by a previous stroke, and required care provided by his father. Perlin was worried that his father would not cope with caring for him and his mother at home. If this happened Perlin would consider residential care placement.

My impression was that Perlin had accepted his situation in a brave and pragmatic manner, and he was trying his best to look after his parents. Perlin talked about having organized as much as he could in order to make things as simple as possible for his parents, this included his advance care plan, his will, and a fully-paid highly detailed funeral plan complete with Spotify playlists to play. 

Over the next two months Perlin was able to stay at home as he gradually deteriorated. His condition  worsened leading to a fall, that led to a hospital admission which resulted in transfer into our inpatient unit for further symptom control and discharge planning. 

Physically a lot had changed since we had last seen Perlin, he needed a lot of assistance and was largely bed bound. Cognitively he was still intact and he greeted me by name in his usual friendly manner. He had been troubled by pain and agreed to us changing his medications to make him more comfortable. 

Two days later, we had a long talk about his worsening situation due to continued rapid progression of his cancer. This was despite steroid treatment, which would only have a temporary effect. Perlin noticed that cognitively he was not as lucid as he was at the time of admission. It was agreed between us, Perlin and his parents that further increases in steroid would not occur.

Perlin said that he did not have any regrets, and that he would be okay with dying, if it was his time, but that he wanted to make the most of his current quality of life. We clarified with Perlin what his idea of quality of life was;  he wanted to not be in pain, didn’t mind being sleepy and in bed or his La-Z-Boy chair, wanted to be able to enjoy the company of his parents, watching movies, eating food, and listening to music. We decided with Perlin that if he was unable to enjoy the above or if he was suffering from uncontrolled pain, then withdrawal of steroids would be appropriate.

Perlin made it clear that he was uninterested in being maintained in a state of limbo, i.e. kept on high dose steroids whilst not having quality of life. We confirmed with Perlin and his parents his ACP wishes. He talked about not wanting to receive futile treatments and being kept alive in a vegetative state. He said, “I don’t want to end up like Michael Schumacher, I don’t want to end up like that.” 

Perlin talked about his Race4Life wishes:  He had been on a helicopter ride,  and a meeting with PM Jacinda Ardern had been arranged for that week but due to NZ’s second COVID-19 Lockdown, Ms Ardern was understandably busy in Wellington. Instead, Perlin wrote a personal note to Ms Ardern who replied back a few days later with a handwritten note and a signed photograph, which please Perlin and his proud parents.

Perlin expressed how glad he was to have completed his ACP already and having arranged for a lot of other things while still relatively well. Perlin said it was important for him to share his story as he thought it could help to encourage other people to make plans early. He was glad that he had done so months ago, as he was too unwell to do so now, which would have caused much distress for him and his parents.

We asked if he needed help with anything else? “No, I’ve sorted almost everything out, except…” Perlin talked about having worked through his movie bucket list and his unsuccessful search for two movies, Run Lola Run, and Tango (1999.) That afternoon I emailed our hospice staff and within hours we had managed to find online access for both of the movies.

In the following week Perlin deteriorated and naturally became more sleepy and less lucid, as previously agreed steroids were reduced whilst medications were adjusted to keep Perlin comfortable.

Perlin was deeply asleep as we discussed the ongoing and rapid deterioration in his condition over the past days – Perlin was dying. His Dad talked about Perlin’s life and how he had always meticulously planned everything. He said that Perlin had already arranged personalised gifts for friends and family. For example, Perlin had arranged a dental appointment for Dad to have his teeth sorted, as well as nice clothing for his mum, who would never spend such money on herself. He had pre-written emails to the teams that had been treating him, that were to be sent out in the event of his death.  He had also given Dad instructions on what to upload to Facebook when he died. I spoke to Perlin and said that we would get him through this, and that we would keep a close eye on his parents too. I was surprised when he answered back, “Thank you, thank you.” 

Perlin was kept comfortable as he continued to deteriorate, and our care focus shifted to also supporting his parents through their most difficult time. Days later Perlin died peacefully in their deeply loving presence.Perlin had been a good friend, a trusted colleague, a Crossfit enthusiast, a world explorer, a brave man who looked after many. His life was not long, but he had packed so much into it. He touched a lot of people during his time, even experienced hospice staff sniffed back some tears as he was dying. 

Perlin had talked about tough topics with grace. ACP can be a scary and uncomfortable concept to get to grips with, but it can be so helpful for peace of mind and to decrease family stress. It was truly a pleasure to be involved with Perlin and his family’s care, and to bear witness to the love and respect that they showed towards each other. Perlin was a fine reflection of his parent’s loving care and parenting skills. Anyone would be proud to have a son like him.  

Goodbye Perlin, and thank you for having made the world a better place with your presence. 

“The last few years have taught me that when it is our time to leave this world no one can stop it. We have one life to live. The material things we invest in are left behind only to be discarded. Live life to the fullest, don’t waste it and do what you want to do.” – Perlin Soong

What matters most? #NPCW18

 

National Palliative Care Week 2018 is just around the corner. This year, we are asking Australians what matters most – to them, to their family & friends, and to their communities?  Continue reading

#WorldAnaesthesiaDay – The role of peri-op ACP: “Mum may die during this operation”

Palliverse is lucky to have a guest submission from rural General Practitioner (GP) Jonathan Ramachenderan, who reflects here on his role as a GP Anaesthetist, with an interest in aged care and palliative care. (He is currently undertaking further training in palliative medicine.) By luck, his post about peri-operative advance care planning (ACP) coincides with World Anaesthesia Day (16th October) and this year’s theme in Australia and New Zealand is “Anaesthesia and Ageing.”

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“There is a real chance that your mum will not survive this operation” I said frankly to Sue.*

Her expression changed immediately to one of disbelief and she replied “What do you mean?!”

“The surgeon said to me that all mum needed was to have her hip fixed and then she would be fine to return back home to the village…I really thought she’d be home pretty soon, I wasn’t expecting you to say this.”

Patiently and well-practiced I said “I am sorry to tell you this but….”

Just then our surgeon burst into our little meeting room (the medication room on the ward). He was smiling, diffusing any thought that I had that I was delaying the operation by talking at length with Ingrid’s daughter.

Sue turned to him and said, “You didn’t tell me that mum may die during or after this operation.”

Her question caught him off guard and his expression changed rapidly to one of seriousness mixed with concern. “Jonathan is right, there is a chance your mum may not leave hospital even after we repair her hip fracture. Given her age, medical issues and frail state, her chances of returning home are significantly reduced”.

This changed the tone of the meeting as it brought into view the real implication of Ingrid undergoing this operation.

The conversation that followed was an important discussion about Ingrid’s stated end of life wishes and how this related to the specific complications of having her hip fracture repaired. Ingrid, aged 85 years old, had importantly completed an Advance Health Directive 3 years earlier with her GP, when she had begun to notice subtle changes in her memory and wanted to make sure her end of life wishes were known. Since then her mobility, general health and memory had declined, which led her to move into a “low level care” village environment, which had revived her zest and enthusiasm for life with the many interesting people and activities. She had suffered a mild heart attack a few years earlier and her breathlessness had recently restricted her movement to only around the house. But a sudden change of direction in the shower had caused her to slip and fall heavily, breaking her right hip.  Standing in that cool medication room on the busy ward, Sue understood the true impact of her mother’s accident and the implications of the proposed operative management.

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Planning care for people with dementia

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Two new resources are now available to help with planning care for people with dementia. Palliverse talked to driving force Prof Meera Agar about the ‘whys’, ‘hows’ and ‘whats’.

Q: Why develop care planning resources just for dementia?

A: People with dementia face unique challenges and decisions related to their care and health care needs as their illness progresses; and supporting their choices is made more complex as they become less able to communicate their needs and articulate decisions about what they want from care. While good intentioned, many health professionals in aged care and other settings may not understand the course of dementia, and there may not always be good communication, involving the person with dementia whenever possible and their families,  and also between the different health professional involved in the persons care.

Q: So how do the new resources help?

A: The two new resources are a website offering practical support for family case conferencing and a report providing guidance on critical recommendations to improve advance care planning. Continue reading

3 online events in the Palliverse this week!

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Here at Palliverse, we love online communities of practice. The monthly #PallANZ tweet chat, co-hosted by Palliverse and Palliative Care Australia, is not the only online educational opportunity that may be of interest this week. While we hope you join us for Thursday evening’s #PallANZ discussion of advance care planning, you might also like to check out the following exciting events: Continue reading

#PallANZ tweet chat: Advance Care Planning

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Advance care planning is an important process that is increasingly being taken up by our community. When done well, it can help those with serious illnesses take control of their future health care. However, many people in our community still do not know about advance care planning, which means those who are likely to benefit from the process are missing out.

How can we do better?  Continue reading

“Do Not Resuscitate” – Is it always right to be resuscitated? @InsightSBS

Tonight in Australia (Thursday, 5 November, 830pm), SBS Insight tackles the topic of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and whether it’s always the right thing to do. (There are some familiar faces in the preview video!)

The discussions on Insight are usually excellent. I’m hoping for some thoughtful conversation about advance care planning, and hearing from people with life-limiting illnesses and their loved ones.

Palliverse will be participating in the Twitter chat surrounding the show (#insightSBS).

You can also join the conversation at Insight’s Facebook page.

I hope there’s enough time for everyone to recover from last night’s Q&A!

@Elissa_Campbell

Elsewhere in the Palliverse – Halloween edition

photo by David Mao itsdavoToday (in some parts of the world) it’s Halloween or, as Caitlin Doughty (@TheGoodDeath) calls it, “Culturally Sanctioned Morbidity Appreciation Day.” Please enjoy these links, which have nothing to do with Halloween but may have something to do with palliative care.

Is death taboo? The Groundswell Project conducted a quick survey. The results may surprise you. (The Groundswell Project)

Health researcher on a mission to get Indigenous men talking about prostate cancer and sexual health (ABC News)

“It’s about starting a conversation…[Doctors need to] throw in a phrase like how you going, how’s the old boy, is he getting up, is he getting the job done?”

“…I find men want to talk about it, but someone has to start the conversation with them.”

The silver tsunami is actually silver-brown. How does end-of-life care differ for minorities? asks geriatrician and palliative care doctor VJ Periyakoil (@palliator) in the Washington Post.

Pulitzer prize-winner Tina Rosenberg visits La Crosse, Wisconsin, home of the Respecting Choices program, where 96% of adults reportedly participate in advance care planning discussions. (Talking Early About How Life Should End, New York Times).

And now, a video about advance care planning!

Going to work, writing letters for the future and speaking your mind: Day-to-day living when you know you’re dying (Independent, UK)

In Australia: Federal Government to legalise growing of medicinal cannabis; Labor calls for nationwide scheme (ABC News). Apparently, we’re all for it: Legalised medical marijuana opposed by only 7% of Australians, poll shows (Guardian Australia)

Here’s a strange story to finish the list – “Parkinson’s disease: Scottish woman Joy Milne prompts study after claiming ability to smell condition.” Odd. Thanks to my colleague Dr Bornshin for the link. (ABC News)

#SoMe (social media) meets palliative care again!

Palliverse loves a bit of #SoMe  interacting with palliative care discussions.

If we have not converted you to tweet chats yet, check out this transcript of the healthcare leaders weekly tweet chat which comes out of North America on a Wednesday 1130 AEDT. This week it was on Palliative Care (yay) but it’s often about change, innovation and patient experience in heath.

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It highlighted again for me the differences between palliative care in the USA and in Australia and New Zealand.  I know from hanging out on tweet chats out of the USA that often you must sign up to forgo all active treatments in order to qualify for hospice care.

I gave NZ a plug as an example of  a country with a good palliative care system (ahead of Aus cos I think NZ is better with community palliative care integration.) Was I right or wrong? What do you think?

Sonia xx

‪#‎ACPEL2015‬ Day 2 Highlights: from Elissa

Greetings from Munich (Grusse aus Munchen)

The morning session was an opportunity to share advance care planning (ACP) success stories from different countries – Singapore (Living Matters), UK (Gold Standard Framework) and the US (Honoring Choices Wisconsin, Kaiser Permanente). Helen Mason from NZ also presented the findings of her Harkness Fellowship, identifying key components of health systems for successful ACP.

To me, the recurring themes were:
– the need for grassroots, community engagement
– identifying and using clinical and community champions of ACP
– the need for a coordinated whole systems approach
– not limiting ACP to end of life – focus on living well, not just dying, and
– employing continuous quality improvement.

Continue reading