#ANZSPM16 Wrap up

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Days two and three of the Australian and New Zealand Society of Palliative Medicine (ANZSPM) 2016 Conference: The Changing Landscape of Palliative Care was just as brilliant as the first. The plenary sessions featured:

  • Merryn Gott (@MerrynGott) spoke about the ‘last taboo’ in our community: the invisible and sometimes unexpected costs of providing care at the end of life, which are often not explored in clinical and almost never measured in policymaking and research. She also discussed  the impact of culture, ethnicity and gender on who is bearing these financial and non-financial costs. To find our more, read her open access @PalliativeMedJ article here.
  • Meera Agar (@meera_agar) discussed the growing evidence base around delirium care in the palliative care setting. Management of this complex, distressing, life-threatening, but often reversible syndrome is challenging. Non-pharmacological strategies and a system-wide approach to organizing and delivering care are crucial, as research into various drug treatments continue to demonstrate a lack of clear benefit and the potential for harm. Meera recommends iDelirium for more information about this important area of palliative care.
  • Pippa Hawley reflected on the lack of evidence around the use of medicinal cannabis – despite the immense interest from (and considerable experience of) our communities. How should clinicians respond while the scientific and legal issues are sorted out? Ask questions, keep an open mind & work with our patients!
  • Douglas McGregor explored the interface between heart failure and palliative care. He referenced Sarah Goodlin’s open access article, Merryn Gott’s study while discussing prognostic uncertainty and clinician paralysis; and observed that most guidelines still see palliative care as relevant only at the very end of life, rather than a key component of chronic disease management. Amy Gadaud’s (@agadoudreview was flagged as a good place to start when considering issues around early integration.
  • Sam Bloore stimulated and inspired delegates with his fascinating talk about dying well in a culture of bitcoin and botox. How can palliative care adapt, survive and thrive in this changing cultural landscape characterized by information overload, mindless distraction and incoherence? We must remain a “subversive” counterculture and continue to strive towards caring deeply and meaningfully!

In addition to these amazing plenaries, fully (and at times even over-)subscribed workshops on the overlap between palliative care and addiction medicine / chronic pain, aged care, literature and the arts were held, alongside numerous excellent oral and poster presentations from specialists and trainees. The enthusiastic and well-informed audience present during all of the sessions was another highlight for me (and I’m sure all of the other speakers and delegates)!

It’s been a wonderful few days in Perth. A big thank you to the Conference organizing committee, chaired by Derek Eng (@dr_engd), for inviting team @Palliverse to be part of this great event. Thanks also to all of you for engaging with #ANZSPM16 on social media. Keep an eye out for our upcoming tweet chats, during which we will continue the conversation about the changing landscape of palliative care!

 

3 online events in the Palliverse this week!

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Here at Palliverse, we love online communities of practice. The monthly #PallANZ tweet chat, co-hosted by Palliverse and Palliative Care Australia, is not the only online educational opportunity that may be of interest this week. While we hope you join us for Thursday evening’s #PallANZ discussion of advance care planning, you might also like to check out the following exciting events: Continue reading

Palliverse takes over @WePublicHealth – for one week only!

FullSizeRenderThis week, Palliverse will be hosting the @WePublicHealth rocur (“rotating curation”) Twitter account. You can read more about @WePublicHealth, “an experiment in citizen journalism meets public health”, over at Croakey blog.

This week, Palliverse will discuss a number of public health palliative care topics such as equitable access to palliative care in Australia/New Zealand and globally, access to essential pain medicines, Compassionate Communities, advance care planning, and more. Continue reading

Social media activity during the 13th Australian Palliative Care Conference

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With a theme of ‘Fit for the Future’, the 13th Australian Palliative Care Conference utilised a coordinated and multifaceted social media strategy to enhance the delegates’ experience and reach new audiences globally. This was achieved through the concerted efforts of team Palliverse (@Palliverse) and other key individuals, including Christian Sinclair (@ctsinclair).  Continue reading

Palliverse people’s database

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(Image: University of Michigan Library Card Catalog by dfulmer / CC BY)

We have updated the Palliverse researchers database and temporarily renamed it “Palliverse people’s database“.

Why, I hear you ask?  Continue reading

#thickenedliquidchallenge with @DrMukeshH: Do thickened fluids benefit people with swallowing problems?

The team at GeriPal started the Thickened Liquid Challenge to raise awareness of the use of thickened liquids (or thickened fluids, as I know them) for people with swallowing difficulties. Thickened fluids are frequently prescribed to people with swallowing difficulties, but the evidence for their long-term benefit is unconvincing, as GeriPal’s Dr Eric Widera explains. In addition, they are unpleasant (as you will see from the videos!) and may result in reduced fluid intake and dehydration. You can read more about it (and watch many videos of the challenge) at GeriPal. Continue reading

Palliverse researchers database update

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(Image: University of Michigan Library Card Catalog by dfulmer / CC BY)

The latest update of the Palliverse researchers database is here! Our numbers continue to grow and we will be talking about (and hopefully recruiting for) the database as a poster presentation at the upcoming Asia Pacific Hospice Conference in Taipei, Taiwan. Come and say hello in person if you will also be attending!

Once again, if you’ve have any stories associated with the database, we’d love to know! Email us at Palliverse@gmail.com

Happy Easter everyone!

Palace of Care/I think therefore I am? – Announcement

Head in HandsPhoto by Alex Proimos under Flicker Creative Commons

To my Palliverse team-mates and our internet friends,

I just wanted to say that it has been a real pleasure working with you all on our Palliverse adventure.

I think we all deserve to give ourselves pats on our backs as we have achieved a lot in our limited collected spare time.

Unfortunately I will have to leave the team, and I apologize in advance for doing it in such a public fashion.

I have thought long and hard about it and with much regret I have to make the right decision for myself and my young family, at this stage in our lives.

It is with a heavy heart that I must bid you all farewell for now. It has been fun while it has lasted and I’ve been very fortunate to have you all in my Palliative Care life. Continue reading

#PCRNV15 Forum

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Thanks to everyone who joined us in person or online today for our presentation at the PCRNV Forum. A special mention must go to James for his great webinar effort! Here is the transcript and analytics for you to enjoy! If you would like to join the Researchers Database, please fill in this Database invitation and send it back to us at Palliverse@gmail.com

Using social media to enhance your clinical and research practice #PCRNV15

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Team Palliverse is excited to be presenting at the upcoming Palliative Care Research Network Victoria (PCRNV) Forum on March 24th at 5pm AEDT (2pm AWST; 7pm NZDT). We will be talking about the use of social media in palliative care research and clinical practice. Join us in person, via webinar or on twitter!

Continue reading