Hot topics – Melbourne 27th March

Keen to learn more? Here is the page you need

 

PaCCSC survey for health professionals on cancer cachexia anorexia syndrome

EXPERIENCES OF HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS DEALING WITH CANCER ANOREXIA CACHEXIA SYNDROME (CACS) (UTS HREC ETH18-2870)

As a health care professional seeing advanced cancer patients who have CACS in your daily practice, you are invited to take part in this online survey. The research will identify barriers, knowledge and management gaps in clinical practice. The survey will take approximately 15 minutes to complete and participation is voluntary and anonymous.
The project is supported by the Palliative Care Clinical Studies Collaborative (PaCCSC) located at the University of Technology Sydney. For more information, please feel free to contact Ms Linda Brown, National Manager, PaCCSC on PaCCSC@uts.edu.au.

Thank you for your time.

link: https://redcap.research.uts.edu.au/surveys/?s=Y984LHMD3Y

Please note: if you have previously completed the survey, please ignore the request.

Sertraline in symptomatic chronic breathlessness: a double blind, randomised trial

It’s a Thing, that we tend to publish and read studies that show that new medications or interventions improve things, rather than that a possible treatment or intervention does not help. But both are important, right? If a treatment that is being given to people is shown to not work, we need to know about that too.

The prolific team at PaCCCS including Professors Currow and Agar have published a trial of sertraline (an antidepressant) in breathlessness and found it did not improve breathlessness scores compared with those taking a placebo tablet. Quality of life improved slightly in those taking the sertraline, however. Overall, they felt that sertraline did not provide benefit.  Continue reading

Conversations with patients in palliative care by Dr Matthew Grant

Dr Matthew Grant, a palliative care specialist, has published this article in The Conversation describing normal conversations in the course of his daily work.

I love the way he sensitively maneuvers through difficult conversations, allowing the patient to control the content of prognostic information given.

   “Not everyone will feel comfortable talking about their future treatment plans like Keith. It’s important I allow Sharon to decide whether or not she wants to talk about a future where she dies, just as I shouldn’t necessarily dissuade Christos from smoking if it gives him pleasure.”

Continue reading

Kimika Lee wins leadership and innovation award

Kimberley Palliative Care Aboriginal Health Worker, Kimika Lee, has been recognised for her tireless work in the community by winning the Leadership and Innovation Award at the Western Australia Regional Achievement and Community Awards this month.

The local Yawuru Broome woman and mother of six said winning the award was a remarkable moment and one she never thought would happen.

See the article in Palliative Matters, thanks Palliative Care Australia

Asia Pacific hospice network presents webinar on dyspnoea 29th October

In conjunction with World Hospice and Palliative Care Day 2018, the APHN will be holding the second APHN Webinar 2018.  Partners all over the region will be screening this webinar at various venues.

AHPN posts, “We are honoured to have Dr Neo Han Yee speaking on the topic of “Management of Dyspnea”. Dr Neo is currently a Consultant at the Department of Palliative Medicine at Tan Tock Seng Hospital.

“Join us! This webinar is FREE for all palliative care colleagues, so SIGN UP NOW at this link. Registration closes when slots have been filled up.

“We would like to thank all participating organisations for hosting this event and supporting this APHN initiative.

“For more information contact Joyce at aphn@aphn.org or call +65 6235 5166. ”

From the website I am not sure whether health professionals who are not in the listed locations are able to participate in the webinar. Palliverse will find out and get back to you.

webinar – palliative care in hospitals 17th October 2PM AEST

Interested in palliative care in hospitals? I certainly am. In my work as a palliative care consultant in the consultation service in an acute hospital, I see a LOT of unmet need, late referrals, and treatment being undertaken without good conversations about the patient’s goals and needs.

We at Palliverse are very keen to promote improvements at a systems level to improve access to palliative care in the acute setting.

On 17th October, Safer Care Victoria is holding a free webinar on palliative care in hospitals. Our host is Claudia Virdun, who has worked in palliative care within a clinical, project management or education position for over 18 years. Claudia has completed an Honours degree (Nursing), Masters degree in Advancing Professional Healthcare Practice and is currently a Phd Candidate with her research focusing on supporting system-level improvements for palliative care within the hospital setting.

Pre-reading for the webinar include Ms. Virdun’s review and meta-synthesis on what is important to patients and families in end of life care in hospitals.

The webinar takes place at 2PM on 17th October AEDT. For those outside of eastern Australia, here’s a time zone converter.

deprescribing at end of life

My pen poised over the drug chart, I hesitate.

Mr Jones* is a 58-year-old patient that my consultation palliative care team is seeing while he’s in hospital with complications of chemotherapy for advanced lung cancer. I am reviewing his discharge medications before he returns home to the care of the community palliative care team.

He is a very optimistic person, not keen to discuss the possibility of his cancer not getting better. An overweight hypertensive smoker, he’s on a full hand of antihypertensives, anti cholesterol medications, vitamin D supplements, a multi-vitamin, and antiplatelet therapy.

His prognosis is likely less than a year in my mind. Does he need all these medications?

A retrospective cohort study by Todd et al examined this question in groups of people with advanced lung cancer in the United States and the UK. The patients had died and been admitted to hospital then discharged at least once in their last 6 months of life.  Continue reading

#ANZSPM18 Conference – New Frontiers

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The Australian and New Zealand Society of Palliative Medicine 2018 Conference #ANZSPM18 is off the a great start, with many excellent plenaries & proffered papers presented on day 1 – following an excellent Trainee Day & pre-Conference workshop on thought leadership.

Day 2 promises to be even more awesome, starting off with keynote speaker Tom Le Blanc sharing his insights on collaboration & integration between palliative care & haematology. The rest of the day will feature a variety of plenaries & concurrent sessions on the new frontiers of palliative medicine – the theme of the conference. I’m also looking forward to the conference dinner tonight!

You can find the sides for my presentation on Palliative Care in Heart & Lung Transplantation here: HLTX PC ANZSPM18 Chi Li

Enjoy!

#ANZSPM Study Day for trainees & new fellows

VCCC

Beautiful spaces inside the Victorian Comprehensive Cancer Centre, the new home of the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in Melbourne, Australia

[The following article by Dr Sarah Dunlop, advanced trainee in palliative medicine, was first published in the Australian & New Zealand Society of Palliative Medicine (ANZSPM) Newsletter. The next ANZSPM study day will be held on September 6th in Sydney prior the the upcoming ANZSPM 2018 Conference. Follow #ANZSPM18 for updates from this biennial meeting – Chi] 

While there are many benefits of living in Western Australia (the weather, the beaches, and charming, debonair palliative medicine trainees), there are also downsides to living in one of the most isolated cities in the world… specifically the isolation! The decision to travel interstate to a course or conference usually hinges on three questions: can I get the time off, can I afford it, and is it going to improve my practice? So after charming my colleagues into giving a debonair trainee a day off and boarding the red-eye to Melbourne, I can confirm that the Study Day for Trainees and New Fellows met all my requirements.  Continue reading