Palace of Care – Wellbeing Tips

Hi everyone,

I shared some wellbeing tips with my workmates and they produced a pdf file that you can download.

Palliative Care Australia awards 2021

Opportunity for Australian members: $2,000 National Palliative Care Award – Nominate now!
Dear Australian readers,

Do you have an hour or so this week to take the time to recognise someone who has made an important contribution to palliative care? Award winners are eligible to receive $2,000 (for individual awards) or $4000 (for team awards) to go toward professional development.

This year there are four new awards with the aim to recognise a broader range of people, including the work in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, generalist areas, community-based care, and Paediatric palliative care.

https://palliativecare.org.au/awards 

The form will roughly take 20 minutes to complete. The person nominating will need to gain approval from the nominee and document whether this person has received an award in the past.
There is a 5000 character written piece that needs to address the criteria of the particular award which can be found here – 

There are now 11 award categories
Individual Awards
Emerging Leader
Emerging Researcher
Excellence in palliative care-rural and remote
Excellence in palliative care in an aged care setting
Outstanding achievement by a volunteer
Excellence in palliative care-Paediatric Palliative Care
Excellence in palliative care-Community Based Care
Excellence in Generalist Palliative Care
Excellence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander palliative care
Organisation/ Team Awards
Outstanding Teamwork Award
Innovation in Palliative Care

Please help PCA and ANZSPM celebrate our heroes.

Research Position Advertised

Research Fellow, Palliative and Supportive Care

HammondCare is looking for a post-doctoral researcher, who has a passion for research which can improve palliative and supportive care.  Working within the Centre for Learning & Research in Palliative Care, the Research Fellow provides high level support for the research effort in palliative & supportive care across the organisation. 

This role offers a post-doctoral researcher an excellent opportunity to develop their research skills, experience and track record within the themes of palliative and supportive care.

  • Position based at Pallister House, Greenwich Hospital.
  • Part time (0.6 FTE), flexible working arrangements. Three years fixed term position.
  • Provide high level support for research in palliative and supportive care

Closing Date: 1st August 2021

For further information about the role and the information pack can be found at  https://www.hammond.com.au/careers/current-vacancies/RF-NSW

For enquiries please contact Prof Josephine Clayton, Director, Centre for Learning & Research in Palliative Care, HammondCare on jclayton@hammond.com.au 

Hot topic webinar by the Centre for Palliative Care

Management of NIV in MND & elective withdrawal of ventilation

 4:00PM – 5:00PM Wednesday 30th June 2021

https://www.centreforpallcare.org/events/75/hot-topic-webinar-management-of-non-invasive-assisted-ventilation-in-motor-neurone-disease-and-elective-withdrawal-of-ventilation

Motor Neurone Disease (MND) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease affecting some 2000 Australians. Average life expectancy from symptom onset is around 30 months. 

Patients show different clinical phenotypes and rates of progression. Death usually results from ventilatory failure secondary to progressive respiratory muscle weakness and can be complicated by aspiration and respiratory infection. Offering respiratory support through non-invasive assisted ventilation (NIV) is considered best practice and can improve quality of life, symptoms and survival in selected patients. Patients usually begin using NIV overnight to improve sleep and daytime wellbeing. Over time, most will use it increasingly across the day, with some becoming NIV dependent. 

Some patients who are dependent on NIV may ask that it be stopped. This is their right. It is not assisted suicide or assisted dying, it is withdrawal of medical treatment. Withdrawal of ventilation needs to be thought through and carefully discussed and planned to ensure that the patient is comfortable throughout the process and both staff and family/carers are supported. 

This presentation gives the opportunity to hear from and ask questions of specialists in Neurology, Respiratory Medicine and Palliative Medicine about the management of NIV in MND and elective withdrawal of ventilation.

Register

#CrazySocks4Docs – #PalliativeCare Edition

Join Team Palliverse for #CrazySocks4Docs day on Friday 4th June 2021!

We will be wearing your craziest socks & hosting a zoom chat to shine a light on the mental health of palliative care doctors, nurses, allied health professionals, researchers, educators, managers & leaders. COVID-19 has made it harder for all of us trying to do our bit for palliative care – those working on the frontline, behind the scenes & on the home front. So to misquote Timothy Leary for our pandemic generation – let’s all “turn up, zoom in & chill out”!

  • Grab a well-deserved drink / generous amounts of chocolate / cuddly animal or doona & settle into a comfy chair / snug beanbag / cozy bed around 8pm NZST (New Zealand) 6pm AEST (Sydney / Melbourne / Brisbane / Canberra) / 5:30pm ACST (Adelaide) / 4pm AWST (Perth) on Friday 4th June 2021
  • Pick up your laptop / tablet / phone & punch in / click on / head to: https://usc-au.zoom.us/j/89540252267
  • Be excellent to each other while catching up with old friends, making new ones & chatting about anything, everything & all things palliative care & self care!

Dying2learn? Conversations with the Australian community around death and dying. Wed 31 March 16:00 AEST

The team at Palliative Nexus is presenting a webinar about death and dying which will be of interest to the #pallanz community. It’s on a laptop near you on Wednesday the 31st of March at 16:00 AEST

Professor Jennifer Tieman will outline her work on the Dying2Learn MOOC (Massive Online Open Course). It won an Innovation in Palliative Care award in 2017.

Prof Tiemen is the Palliative and Supportive Services and Matthew Flinders Fellow, College of Nursing and Health Sciences at Flinders University.

She will discuss the research arising from this excellent MOOC including community perspectives on death and dying.

Please register here: http://go.unimelb.edu.au/5mpi

Volunteers sought for research on delirium


TITLE: Development of a core outcome set for effectiveness trials of interventions to prevent and/or treat delirium in palliative care (Del-COrS)

We are currently looking for volunteers including: patients, family members, carers, healthcare professionals and researchers with experience of delirium in palliative care.

Participants would complete two online surveys to establish their views on the outcomes that are important to include in future studies of interventions to prevent or to treat delirium in palliative care. We will subsequently invite participants to a meeting to discuss the findings and vote on outcomes they consider important.

Our goal is to develop international consensus on a core outcome set for research studies of treatments within a palliative care setting to prevent, and/or treat delirium.

Researchers look at the effects of potential treatments on patients by measuring an ‘outcome’. For example, in a study of how well a new delirium treatment works in a palliative care setting, an ‘outcome’ might be: whether a person hurt themselves because of delirium.

When a set of main outcomes has been agreed for a health condition, it’s called a ‘core outcome set’. This would allow all studies of delirium in palliative care to be compared and combined.

Please contact Dr Anna Bryans (Research Team Member) at abb526@york.ac.uk if you are interested in participating and pass on this information to anyone who may wish to take part.  

I think therefore I am? – International Journal of Whole Person Care – COVID-19 special issue

Photo by Mika Baumeister on Unsplash

To read real stories of courageous healthcare professionals from 6 countries risking their own lives to save ours during the COVID-19 pandemic click here.

New Palliative Care phone advice service in Victoria, Australia

The Palliative Care Advice Service is a phone-based service for people in Victoria, Australia, seeking access to specialist guidance and advice. It offers an advice service for those living with a life-limiting illness and those who support them. The service is for family, friends and neighbours as well as all healthcare workers.

Specialist nurses and doctors provide information about serious illness and symptoms, being a caregiver and the palliative care service system.

For healthcare workers, it offers guidance about prescribing, symptom management, locating appropriate services and decision-making.

The Parkville Integrated Palliative Care Service at The Royal Melbourne Hospital runs the service from 7am – 10pm, seven days a week. The Advice Service is free, confidential and available for everyone in Victoria.

To contact the Palliative Care Advice Service you can call 1800 360 000 or visit www.pcas.org.au for further information.

Family meetings in palliative care reduce carer distress

Offering a structured family meeting conducted in a hospital setting for patients with advanced disease receiving palliative care may be helpful in reducing family caregiver distress and enhancing their sense of preparation for the caregiving role.


The cluster randomised, multi-site study was lead by Prof Peter Hudson at St Vincent’s Hospital in Melbourne. It examined results from around 150 control and 150 intervention patients and caregivers.

The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of structured family meetings on patient and family caregiver outcomes and to determine the cost-benefit and resource implications of implementing family meetings into routine practice.

Family caregivers in the intervention group had significantly lower psychological distress scores and higher preparedness scores two weeks after the intervention, but the scores were not significantly different two months after the patient died.

The family meetings in intervention participants were structured according to published guidelines and tailored to the needs of the patient and family.

In summary, the guidelines incorporate:
(1) principles for conducting family meetings;

(2) pre-meeting procedures, such as liaising with the patient/family and prioritising issues;

(3) deciding who needs to attend the family meeting;

(4) a procedure for conducting the meeting; and

(5) strategies for follow up after the meeting; including phoning the primary family caregiver 2 days later to discern if discussion and actions arising from the meeting were helpful.

What is already known about the topic?
A family meeting (also known as a family conference) is a clinical tool for healthcare providers to facilitate communication and care planning with patients and their family caregivers.
Whilst these meetings are considered integral to palliative care they are commonly not provided systematically, nor according to best available evidence.

Implications for practice
Hospital staff should consider conducting a family meeting as soon as feasible after admission of a patient with advanced disease, or referral to the palliative care team where resources allow. This is commensurate with guidelines and standards for family support. It is also in keeping with the concept of ‘early’ palliative care for which there is a growing evidence base.

Sonia