Whisper No More

‘Whisper No More‘ is a learning package that contains stories from Aboriginal people about their experience of cancer. Linked to a decade of research, it was prompted by findings from ‘A whispered sort of stuff‘, a report on a study undertaken with mid-west communities in Western Australia.

‘Whisper No More’ is freely available online for registered users and includes videos, discussion questions and links to key articles and websites. There is also specific content relating to future planning and discussions about end of life care.

FINAL_Flyer_WhisperNoMore_180528 (palliverse)

Understanding decision-making among people living with dementia

Decision-making in dementia survey

Researchers from the University of Western Australia and the Cognitive Decline Partnership Centre are trying to understand more about how Australian healthcare professionals understand and make judgements on decision-making among people living with dementia.

If you are an Australian health care professional or aged care worker and provide care, services or treatment to people living with dementia as part of your role, you are invited to participate in this short, online survey.

The study information and survey is available here

Study of palliative care triage in Australia

Demand for palliative care services in inpatient, community, outpatient and consultation services is increasing. In the context of finite resources, patients referred should undergo ‘triage’ – derived from the French term ‘trier’ meaning ‘to sort’ – the process of deciding which patients should be treated first based on how urgent their needs are.

A new study conducted in Victoria, Australia, explored palliative care providers’ practices and attitudes towards triaging palliative care needs and their views regarding the implementation of a standardised approach.

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Bring dying refugee to Australia for palliative care, urge health professionals

Thousands of doctors have signed a petition calling on the immigration minister, Peter Dutton, to bring a refugee dying of advanced lung cancer to Australia for palliative care.

The 63-year-old is being held on Nauru and is a member of the persecuted Hazara minority in Afghanistan. He has been formally recognised as a refugee. But the Australian Border Force told the man that he could not come to Australia for palliative care, despite claims that the palliative care available on Nauru is inadequate.

The Australian Border Force  (ABF) has told the 63-year-old patient, who is suffering from advanced lung cancer, that he is deemed to have “refused treatment” because he declined to be moved to Taiwan to die. Cynically, the ABF has also offered the patient $25,000 to return home to Afghanistan. Continue reading

APLI forum Sydney 5 September promoting palliative care in Asia-Pacific

Interesting in helping to develop palliative care in the Asia-Pacific region?

APLI is the Australasian Palliative Link International.

It is a small charitable organisation made up of Australian and New Zealand palliative care clinicians. APLI aims :

  • to develop and foster links between palliative care providers and organisations in Australia and New Zealand and the Asia-Pacific region
  • to raise awareness of the needs of new palliative care services and the need for further development of the discipline in the region.
  • to provide a forum for the exchange of information and ideas between providers of palliative care in the region.

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Supported decision-making for aged care providers: Launch of a Policy Development Guideline

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Researchers from the Cognitive Decline Partnership Centre are releasing a Policy Development Guideline on Supported Decision-Making for aged care providers in Australia. Supported Decision-Making is a rights-based approach aimed at enabling people living with disability to make and/or communicate decisions about their own lives. Supported Decision-Making is promoted within the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the Australian Law Reform Commission’s National Decision-Making Principles. This area is also topical for aged care providers, given current reviews of guardianship legislation in a number of Australian states.

This free seminar will give an overview of the broader research project, and explain the process of guideline development, with tips for implementation in aged care settings.

Registration is free, but places are limited.

 

 

Final Program for Palliative Care Nurses Australia (PCNA) Biennial Conference: Fostering Excellence in Palliative Care

It’s not too late to register for this year’s Palliative Care Nurses Australia Conference in Brisbane!

PCNAust18 Conference Banner_18

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What matters most? #NPCW18

 

National Palliative Care Week 2018 is just around the corner. This year, we are asking Australians what matters most – to them, to their family & friends, and to their communities?  Continue reading

One weekend, two funerals

A few weeks ago I had the unusual circumstance of attending two events to mark the passing of people in my life, in the same weekend. One was for a family member, and one for a close friend. I have wanted to reflect on how we express ourselves and each other in funeral practices. The events were very different, and having them so close upon each other made the contrast seem quite noticeable. Both expressed the love and loss in touching ways. Below is a short pastiche of images and moments, which I hope will paint a picture.

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Of monkeys, metrics and quality palliative care

What does quality palliative care mean? It is a more complicated question than it seems.
question Stefan Baudy

Question! Stefan Baudy

Healthcare systems have been grappling with defining quality care for some time. Some aspects of quality care, such as equitable and timely access, are understood and broadly applicable regardless of the type of care provided. Others fit more awkwardly with palliative care provision.

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