#advancecareplanning seminar in Melbourne 9 August

Featuring not one but two Palliverse tweeps, @csinclair28 and @sonialf, this seminar at Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in central Melbourne, Australia will be of interest to the healthcare sector including aged care and acute care.

Well-coordinated and appropriate person-centred care is a key priority. It’s becoming increasingly important for the healthcare sector to better understand advance care planning, which supports an individual’s values, goals and preferences.

Presented by Advance Care Planning Australiathe Department of Health and Human Servicesthe Office of the Public Advocate and Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, this Melbourne-based Victorian seminar will be run by recognised leaders in the field of advance care planning in Australia. To find out more about the program, see the agenda here.

The topics covered include advance care planning across sectors, legal considerations and local initiatives. The event is recommended for professionals leading and implementing advance care planning in health services, residential aged care and primary care.

Venue: Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre – Lecture Theatre B, 305 Grattan Street, Melbourne VIC 3000.

Date: Friday, 9 August 2019, 9:00am – 4:30pm. Registration and refreshments start at 8:00am.

Program: see the agenda here.

Cost: $100 (including GST).

Catering: Included in the ticket price.

Registration

Register on Eventbrite here.

Registration closes Friday 26 July 2019 at 9pm AEST.

 

Caring@home seeks translators – Vietnamese and Tagalog

caring@home project – seeking translators

The caring@home (www.caringathomeproject.com.au) project is looking for palliative medicine specialists or trainees to review some resources for carers being translated into Vietnamese and Tagalog.  caring@home has produced resources for carers to support carers to help manage breakthrough symptoms safely using subcutaneous medicines.

A company that uses accredited translators have been contracted to do the work but the project has also requested the opportunity to have a health care professional, who is a native speaker of the language, to review the translation and subtitles.

The work would be expected to be completed in May and June. They are able to offer a stipend for this work of $800 + GST upon receipt of an invoice.

The work is to review the following after they come back from the translating service:

If you are interested in undertaking this work, please contact Karen Cooper, Project Manager for caring@home on E: Karen.Cooper3@health.qld.gov.au or M: 0428 422 818.

Immunotherapy Symptoms Clinical Trials: a new paradigm Melbourne Wed 12th June

Would you like to learn more about immunotherapy use and trials in cancer and in palliative care?

Immunotherapy Symptoms Clinical Trials: a new paradigm forum

Palliative, supportive and cancer care professionals are invited to attend the VCCC and CST co-hosted Immunotherapy Symptoms Clinical Trials: a new paradigm forum to progress clinical trials concepts in this evolving oncology field, recognise achievements, celebrate success and make connections for future directions. 

Palliative care progress and achievements

The VCCC Building Trial Group Capability Program initial investment is focused on developing the palliative care group as a key priority area. The group’s development and activities have been underway for more than 12 months; it is timely to celebrate progress and achievements.

Here is a program for the day

Registrations are now open for the palliative care sessions in the afternoon. Please note you will need to register for morning and afternoon sessions separately.

Survey for Australian doctors – medical practice in treatment of delirium

ANZSPM has received the following request from Dr AnnMarie Hosie, Post-doctoral Research Fellow, IMPACCT – Improving Palliative, Aged and Chronic Care through Clinical Research and Translation, University of Technology Sydney

MEDICAL PRACTICE IN THE TREATMENT OF DELIRIUM

You are invited to participate in a brief (10 minute) online survey about medical practice in the treatment of delirium.

The survey is for medical professionals working clinically in Australia.

Your time and insights towards better understanding of clinical practice for this common and serious medical problem will be greatly appreciated.

For more information, and to begin the survey, please click on this link: Medical practice in the treatment of delirium

If you have any queries, please contact Dr Annmarie Hosie at annmarie.hosie@uts.edu.au

Palliative care and #ausvotes19

It’s election time again! Honestly, we have not had a new Prime Minister for ages in Australia. We sadly can’t have Jacinda Ardern, but there it is.
Dr Benjamin Thomas (@andiyarus)  has been tweeting up a storm putting pressure on the powers-that-be and the powers-that-wannabe in advocating for #palliativecare patients in the upcoming election. He visited the @Palliverse to answer a few questions for us. Continue reading

Survey – clinical trials in specialist palliative care

If you are a nurse, doctor or allied health professional in a specialist palliative care service please consider contributing to the survey below. It does not take long.

“Attitudes of Palliative Care Practitioners Towards Enrolling Patients in Clinical Trials

We would appreciate your participation in this survey as a health care professional who provides care to patients in palliative care settings.
Continue reading

Research nurse position

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Research Nurse 2019 Final

Advance care planning week 1-5 April

National Advance Care Planning Week encourages all Australians to speak up about their future healthcare preferences and make sure their voice is heard and respected, regardless of what the future brings.

“If you were really ill, and could not speak to the doctors about the health care you wanted and did not want,

WHO would speak for you?

and WHAT would they say?”

#acpweek19

How can people get involved?

– visit acpweek.org.au for more information and access the relevant forms in their state or territory.
-attend a National Advance Care Planning Week event
-request a free email starter pack

Palace of Care – In his arms

mayur-gala-487-unsplash

Photo by Mayur Gala on Unsplash

It had been a great game of football, they had managed to successfully complete a number of moves that they had been practising for weeks. He was proud of the fact that the ball was always safe, in his arms.

The post-match party was a happy and raucous affair, a swirl of colours and noise, but everything seemed to stop, when she walked into the room.

Their eyes met across the crowded space, everyone else became invisible and they instantly fell in love. Soon she was, in his arms.

Fast-forward 23 years to an admission into our family room. Again a swirl of colours and noise as they settled into the room with their seven children, and their children’s children.

Early on in their relationship they had reflected on their own upbringing, having being raised by their grandparents, they made a pact that they would raise their own kids themselves.

And they did so over the next 22 years which were filled with joy.

She had become unwell over the past year, needing many trips to clinics and hospital for many treatments and even more disappointments. Always supported by their family  who stayed strong around them.

It had taken a lot of convincing to allow Hospice into their lives – he was scared of them – but the fears were soon allayed by the visiting staff.

Barely three weeks ago she had organised a family trip up North, just them and their four youngest children. “She knew that her time was short, and that was her preparing me.”

During the weekend, he had shared, “Thank you for providing this large room for us, it has allowed me to be the husband again, and the father to my kids, we can be ourselves again.”

There were many visitors over the weekend and into the new week.

On the very last night the couple were together, peacefully in bed, surrounded by the love from all their kids sleeping on the floor around them.

Coming back from the bathroom on the final morning, held up in his arms, “I think it’s my time to go.”

Gently back to bed, still in his arms.

Feeling safe, surrounded by the best things in the world, their kids and grand-kids.

She leaned back, in his arms, and then quietly left the room.

“She was looking after us all, right until the very end, giving us the strength to carry on walking tall.”

Hot topics – Melbourne 27th March

Keen to learn more? Here is the page you need