Guest Post by Liese Groot-Alberts

Liese is an experienced Palliative Care Educator, Mentor and Clinical Supervisor who has helped and inspired many people in New Zealand, Australia, the Pacific Islands and many other countries. I’ve had the pleasure of seeing Liese present live in person at various conferences and workshops, which has always been a real treat. Liese has kindly shared some of her personal thoughts in the hope that they will help others during the trying times that we all find ourselves in. Thanks Liese!

 

The art of communicating compassion in PPE: Pantomime of Purposeful Expression.

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“ behind glass” by Marta Bevacqua, Paris

 

“Make your choices based on love, not fear” – Dr. Elisabeth Kübler-Ross

In my work as a mentor and clinical supervisor of healthcare staff, I am currently hearing expressions of grief, frustration, anxiety, concerns and sometimes a sense of powerlessness in this Covid-19 pandemic. Staff are talking about feeling clumsy and inadequate in their communication of compassionate care to patients through layers of PPE. This combined with a high-powered, stressful, anxious working environment makes it paramount for staff to commit to time for self-care and self-reflection, increasing their awareness of how they are in body, mind, heart and soul, in order to be able to practice compassionate care.

I repeatedly hear: “I don’t have time for self-care or reflection, I am too busy juggling work and home, I feel like I am running all the time.”

I totally agree, life before covid-19 was busy enough and now is for most – in essential services especially- even more pressured. However, I also would like to challenge your statement of “no time” with a simple exercise to do at work, that takes about 15 seconds, can reduce some stress and anxiety and be helpful in re-connecting you with your compassion.

Unless you are on your way to an emergency of course, then just take one deep breath and run!!! Continue reading

I think therefore I am? – Online wellbeing resources from the NZ Mental Health Foundation

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Wellbeing resources for frontline healthcare workers are available from the NZ Mental Health Foundation’s website – this easy to navigate website includes lots of useful tips for this difficult time we all find ourselves in. As well as links to websites, Frequently Asked Questions, and downloadable resources.

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On a similar theme is their well-designed All Right? website which also includes links to their getting through together campaign designed with COVID-19 in mind. Plenty of good wellbeing ideas for all age groups are contained in this vibrant, colourful and energetic looking website. Well done NZ Mental Health Foundation!

Both of these websites are well worth a deeper exploration and may be helpful to yourself and others in your bubbles.

Stay safe and take care.

COVID-19 Resource Links page available on our menu

Hi everyone,

We have curated/collated links to COVID-19 related palliative care resources onto a special page that can be found via our menu.

Please check it out, and please share with us any other resources you’d like added to the comments section.

Stay safe and take care.

Together we will make it through this.

James for Team Palliverse.

I think therefore I am? – If only there was an App to help us through COVID-19…

Mentemia

My 10 year old son and I watched a story about the Mentemia App on TV last night. Mentemia means ‘my mind’ in Italian.

Mentemia is a wellbeing App that has been co-developed by NZ’s Sir John Kirwan, famous former All Black and long-time Mental Health Advocate. Mentemia is currently free to download for all New Zealanders thanks to a funding deal between Mentemia and the NZ Ministry of Health. It is available on the Google Play and Apple App Stores.

We downloaded it last night and we both started using it.

It has a nice user interface and is easy to navigate, with good use of Simple English throughout. We found the interactive exercises fun to do, and things like spinning the wheel to choose a daily act of kindness to perform are also cool additions.

The ability to record how your mood is at anytime will be useful.

Lots of links to useful videos and articles to read, including lots of staying calm through COVID-19 articles.

At first glance Mentemia looks like an useful wellbeing app that we will both be returning to on a daily basis.

Some parts of the app are still a bit buggy, so far we’d give it a 7/10.

Summary of WHO Mask Guidance Article released on 06/04/2020

Hi everyone,

I summarised this latest article from the WHO for my workmates.

COVID-19 is transmitted by:

  1. Droplets coughed or sneezed out
  2. Close contact – within 1m

Incubation period (Time from exposure to symptoms developing) = Pre-symptomatic period is average 5-6 days, but could be as long as 14 days (hence self-isolation period of 14 days recommended by MOH)

Pre-symptomatic transmission possible but person would be coughing or sneezing to produce droplets, and contaminating their surface surroundings.

Non-Medical masks (Do It Yourself), e.g. cotton masks, no current evidence to support or not support use. One study of health care workers using cotton masks showed that they were at increased risk of infection compared to those who wore medical masks.

Medical masks:

Should be reserved for health care workers.

Masks by themselves – Not adequate protection. Continue reading

Palace of Care – In his arms

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Photo by Mayur Gala on Unsplash

It had been a great game of football, they had managed to successfully complete a number of moves that they had been practising for weeks. He was proud of the fact that the ball was always safe, in his arms.

The post-match party was a happy and raucous affair, a swirl of colours and noise, but everything seemed to stop, when she walked into the room.

Their eyes met across the crowded space, everyone else became invisible and they instantly fell in love. Soon she was, in his arms.

Fast-forward 23 years to an admission into our family room. Again a swirl of colours and noise as they settled into the room with their seven children, and their children’s children.

Early on in their relationship they had reflected on their own upbringing, having being raised by their grandparents, they made a pact that they would raise their own kids themselves.

And they did so over the next 22 years which were filled with joy.

She had become unwell over the past year, needing many trips to clinics and hospital for many treatments and even more disappointments. Always supported by their family  who stayed strong around them.

It had taken a lot of convincing to allow Hospice into their lives – he was scared of them – but the fears were soon allayed by the visiting staff.

Barely three weeks ago she had organised a family trip up North, just them and their four youngest children. “She knew that her time was short, and that was her preparing me.”

During the weekend, he had shared, “Thank you for providing this large room for us, it has allowed me to be the husband again, and the father to my kids, we can be ourselves again.”

There were many visitors over the weekend and into the new week.

On the very last night the couple were together, peacefully in bed, surrounded by the love from all their kids sleeping on the floor around them.

Coming back from the bathroom on the final morning, held up in his arms, “I think it’s my time to go.”

Gently back to bed, still in his arms.

Feeling safe, surrounded by the best things in the world, their kids and grand-kids.

She leaned back, in his arms, and then quietly left the room.

“She was looking after us all, right until the very end, giving us the strength to carry on walking tall.”

Palliative Care Specialist Job Vacancy

Hi everyone,

If you are a Palliative Care Specialist and want to join a team that is constantly trying to make the world a better place for dying patients please check out this job vacancy available at Totara Hospice South Auckland, by  clicking here.

At least an 0.6FTE position is available but this has recently become negotiable potentially up to 1.0FTE for the right candidate.

Please share this post with anyone you think might be interested.

Cheers,

James

I think therefore I am? – The D word

It was only about 80 years ago when communities all over the world were much more familiar with Death and Dying. This was before antibiotics, modern surgical techniques and lots of medical technologies had been invented. Now Death and Dying are not so obvious and it is not uncommon for 30+ year olds to have never been to a funeral before in their life.

Even now, Death and Dying are still D words that are avoided by many clinicians as they try to ‘protect’ their patients. Who are they really trying to protect? Themselves?

Other D words could be:

Denial

Disavowal

Disillusionment

Disappointment

Despair

Defeat

These were some of the D words that came to mind while listening to this podcast:

Dr Kathryn Mannix talks about her best-selling book “With the end in mind,” and reflects on her Palliative Care career

Have a listen and let me know what you think.

James

I think therefore I am ? – A special Totara Hospice South Auckland event this Friday.

07/12/17 – Update – Attendees please note that tomorrow morning in Auckland there will be a Railway Workers Strike meaning that road traffic will likely be much heavier than usual. We have asked attendees to arrive at 8.45am for a 9am start, please factor in the strike traffic delay when planning your travel for tomorrow morning. If you arrive early you can visit our on-site Cafe Totara for a fresh Barista-made coffee, with a range of fresh food available as well, all prepared on-site. An email update will be sent to attendees who have already registered.

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Hi everyone,

Can healing occur at the end of life?

To whom does compassion need to extend to at the end of life?

These are the type of questions that will be explored in Totara Hospice South Auckland’s education centre this Friday morning, 08 December 2017 9am to 12pm.

We are privileged to be hosting two international speakers.

Dr Rob Rutledge will be joined by a special guest.

We will be honoured to also have in attendance, Tibetan Buddhist Monk, Za Choeje Rinpoche.

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Please join us for a very special interactive workshop in which we will attempt to challenge your thinking and change the stasis quo.

RSVP details are contained in the below pdf.

Morning tea refreshments will be provided.

Please pass on this invitation to anyone in your networks who might be interested in attending.

Cheers,

James

Invitation Compassion and Healing Seminar.pdf

2017 ANZSPM Aotearoa Annual Conference and AGM

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We at Palliverse love a conference, especially one that “brings together doctors working in palliative care” in Aotearoa/New Zealand.

The 2017 ANZSPM Aotearoa Annual Conference and AGM will be held in Christchurch this year. It all starts off with the Trainee Day on 11/08/17 which is open to all Palliative Medicine trainees, General Practitioners with a special interest in Palliative Care and Medical officers working in Palliative Care.

The 2017 Annual Education Update Programme is packed with many topics of interest, and will be a good opportunity to catch up with what is going on all over the country, as well as catching up with new and old friends. This year Dr Wendy Pattemore will be introducing a new session called, “Wild Successes and Fabulous Failures,” which will provide an opportunity to share how Palliative Care is done in your own ‘patch’.

To register you can either use this 2017 Annual Education Days and Trainee Day Registration Form or register via the website. Attendees must be ANZSPM members. Our friends from Australia are always very welcome!

For my reflections from the 2015 ANZSPM Aotearoa conference, click here.