Palace of Care – “Thank you for teaching me an important lesson.”

This blogpost is dedicated to a patient that I never thanked for the part she had to play in my palliative care education.

The sharing of patient stories can have a huge role to play in the education of healthcare practitioners and laypeople. Palliative Care health literacy remains relatively low despite palliative care services having been present in Australia and New Zealand for well over three decades. Relatively few healthcare practitioners let alone members of the general public understand the role that palliative care services can have in the improvement of quality of life. Are we sharing the right stories, in the right places, to the right people?

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#ANZSPM16 tweet chat: Medicinal cannabis and palliative care

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In recent years scientific research into the effects of cannabinoids has been on the increase. Some would say that not-so-scientific research on the effects of cannabis has been underway for many hundreds of years, in many different countries and cultures.

Until recently I didn’t know that our own bodies produce endogenous cannabinoids, the various effects of which are still being studied. 

Two years ago, colleagues had informed me that at the Montreal Conference 2015 it was a ‘smokingly hot’ topic. The most widely studied cannabis-derived cannabinoids are Cannabidiol (CBD) and Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC.) You may have heard of some of the medications that have ‘come to market’ since then:  Continue reading

I think therefore I am/Palace of Care – Hospice New Zealand 2016 Conference Keynote Presentation

Hi everyone,

Here is a copy of my slides from the Keynote presentation that I made on 16/09/16 at the Hospice New Zealand 2016 Conference.

I was intentionally being provocative and I was purposefully trying to challenge the audience’s mindset with the material that I presented, as I believe that New Zealand Hospice/Palliative Care needs to be “shaken up,” if it is to remain relevant. Now it’s your turn, you have been warned…

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I am working on a version which will have clickable links, and also on a recorded live performance of the presentation. In the meantime the slides with comments have been loaded onto the Palliverse Instagram account.

Cheers,

James

3 online events in the Palliverse this week!

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Here at Palliverse, we love online communities of practice. The monthly #PallANZ tweet chat, co-hosted by Palliverse and Palliative Care Australia, is not the only online educational opportunity that may be of interest this week. While we hope you join us for Thursday evening’s #PallANZ discussion of advance care planning, you might also like to check out the following exciting events: Continue reading

#SHCR: An inspiring, free course that will help you change health care for the better

When I first read Sonia’s post about the School for Health and Care Radicals (SHCR) a year ago, little did I know that I would be signing up for one of the most inspiring educational experiences of my ten years as a doctor, resulting in unexpected personal and professional growth.

“Anyone who wants to bring about change has to be ready to break the rules. But in health and social care, that can be really difficult. The art of rocking the boat while staying in it is something it seems no-one is ready to help you learn.” – School for Health and Care Radicals

 

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Working on my SHCR workbook – over coffee

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A real death: what can you expect during a loved one’s final hours? via @ConversationEDU

A real death: what can you expect during a loved one’s final hours?

Charles Corke, Deakin University and Peter Martin, Barwon Health

It’s hard to predict events in the final days and hours of a person’s life. Some deaths are wonderful – a gentle decline preceding a gracious demise. Certainly these are the sorts of deaths we see in films or on television, where the dying patient bids farewell to gathered family and friends before softly closing his eyes.

These gentle departures happen in real life too – many people simply die in their sleep, and many families and friends share the privilege of witnessing the calm and serene departure of a loved one. Of course, grief follows, but those left behind are able to take solace in the knowledge and memory of a peaceful passing.

Unfortunately for every “good” death, there are many which are much more stormy and drawn out. These deaths can leave families traumatised for many years or simply make the grief that much harder.

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e-Enhancement of Palliative Care?

Hospice NZ PC lecture series 2015

Hiya folks,

Palliverse’s very own James Jap presented last Thursday morning’s Genesis Oncology Trust / Hospice New Zealand Palliative Care Lecture, which was broadcast to NZ hospices and other palliative care centres.

Listen to James’s lecture here. On the same site you will find the other lectures of the series over the past few years.

Enjoy!

Research Basics: EQUATOR, CONSORT, STROBE – what’s all that about?

EQUATOR is a good place to start if you’re struggling with writing up your research protocol or results. The EQUATOR Network (Enhancing the QUAlity and Transparency Of health Research) provides guidelines for reporting different types of health research. The EQUATOR Network is an international initiative that aims to “achieve accurate, complete, and transparent reporting of all health research studies” and includes researchers, journal editors, peer reviewers, and other relevant bodies. Continue reading

Centre for Palliative Care – lecture on palliative sedation by A. Prof Jenny Philip

The Centre for Palliative Care in Melbourne runs a series of Hot Topics lectures for the field. They have kindly published videos of their recent talks, which we would like to share with you.

The Palliverse team are going to start a collection of resources in free open access medical and nursing education (#FOAMed and #FOANed) relative to Palliative Care, and here’s the first addition to the collection.

A.Prof Jenny Philip is a wonderful speaker and takes us on a journey through the controversial issue of palliative sedation. Starting with definition (variable) and incidence (also variable), she describes for us some European guidelines on palliative sedation and then guides a panel of experienced palliative care professionals through three cases exploring issues in palliative sedation.

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