I think therefore I am? – Hearts and Minds

Photo by Jon Tyson on Unsplash

To do palliative care and hospice well your heart does need to be in it. People can easily tell if you are not really there. It doesn’t have to be as obvious as someone who won’t sit down, or who constantly checks the time on their watch. Do you have somewhere more important to be at the moment, than in my room? Something more important that needs to be done than listening to me?

If someone’s heart isn’t really in it people can tell right away. The lack of attention that is paid to simple things. So we do want people to be engaged to actually care for people. It does need to be done professionally, with kindness and respect. People need to have firm boundaries that they do not cross. It’s about protecting yourself and also the person that you are working with. You can be friendly but cannot be their friend. You can be caring but it must be in a professional manner. We are guests in their lives, and we do not want to disrupt pre-existing relationships.

We are involved possibly in the final chapter of someone’s book of life. It is not about us, but about them. They are the stars of their own show, of their own movie, of their own stories. We are only extras, or play a tiny bit part. We may have only a few lines to say, and we will try to say them well. The direction of the story needs to be guided by the person going through it all. We would not be in the same room as them if they were not sick, if they did not need the care that we can provide. We must never forget that, that they are not here because of us, but that we are all here because of them. The patient needs to be at the centre of everything that we do, not their family members or friends but the actual person themselves.

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Introducing Bedside Lessons – What isn’t done, isn’t done.

Photo by noosha ghodsizad on Unsplash

It’s ironic that I am writing on a daily basis now when I barely paid attention in English classes and did not even do English in my last year at high school. I had a bad attitude back then and scoffed at having to read Hamlet, 1984 and Brave New World, choosing instead to read Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’ Watchmen. Interesting that I can still remember all four books 31 years later.

The same applies to behavioural science lectures during medical school, I didn’t realise that upon graduation that a lot of the psycho-social-spiritual-cultural stuff covered in those lectures would be much more important in my day to day work life than the physical stuff. My training was in the traditional biomedical reductionist style. Medical school takes a young tree hungry for growth and knowledge and whittles it down to a sharp but prickly toothpick, with an ego the size of a man-made forest developed along the way.

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Bedside Lessons – 5. Week One – Here’s the deal

Photo by David Cain on Unsplash

Thursday

I want you to be really honest with me, has the pain relief worked?

Yeah, I think it has, I’m moving better. I had four hours of sleep last night which is pretty good for me.

I’d like to increase your pain relief from 25 to 35.

Could we make it 30? I don’t want to be too sleepy.

Okay sure. If you disagree with my plan you let me know and we’ll change it. I will be guided by what you want or don’t want. That’s a sweet tattoo on your arm, is that your son?

Yeah, he was a cute baby. I became a dad when I was 20. My son will be five in two months, I hope that I’ll be able to see him start school.

Friday

Hey I saw you walking around before, how you doing?

Good man. I had the best sleep in the last two years. No pain.

Really?

Yeah, I feel good.

That’s great, if this keeps up we can start talking about going home soon.

It’s Fathers’ Day on Sunday.

Yeah, that’s right, we’ll see how you go, if you are still good, we’ll aim for home Sunday.

Monday

I just wanted to say see ya later.

Thanks man, for everything.

My pleasure bro, I wish you well.

[Fist Bump] [Smile with eyes, with mask on emoji]

Lessons learnt:

It is important to be honest with your patients, as you need to build their trust in you.

Allowing patients to share in decision making helps to empower them. Give them back some control, in an illness situation in which so much control has been stolen from them.

Make it clear that they can disagree with any of your treatment plans, and that you will listen to them and that within reason you will adjust appropriately according to their wishes.

Say what you mean, then do what you say.