Research on health practitioner norms and wellbeing in the context of assisted dying legislation

question Stefan Baudy

Health practitioners are invited to participate in research concerning the assisted dying legislation in Victoria, and how it will affect health practitioner well-being and norm development, particularly in the work context. This study is being conducted by researchers from Flinders University.

Interested health practitioners can find out more and participate in the research here.

The researchers would also like to request that if you think it is appropriate, you share this invitation with other health practitioners. Please also feel free to contact the research team directly with any comments or questions (via the link above).

Love is not enough: National Advance Care Planning Week 2020

ACPWeek2020 video

This video, produced by Advance Care Planning Australia, encourages fit and healthy Australians to more seriously consider why advance care planning is important in their lives.

Australian couples were put to the test by asking them how well they know their loved one. While they were mostly able to correctly answer questions about preferred foods and holiday destinations, when it came to questions about end-of-life choices, things take an interesting turn…

Please watch the video and feel free to share it with your network #LoveIsNotEnough
National Advance Care Planning Week runs from 23 – 27 March 2020, and currently has 140 events scheduled, in locations across Australia. For more information, or to host an event, visit the ACP Week website

 

 

Study shows why cancer patients are asking for medicinal cannabis

I can tell you, it’s true! Many cancer patients are asking their clinicians for medicinal cannabis – but worryingly,  around one in four patients believing it will help in control or cure the cancer, a Victorian study has found.

This study was carried out by a team at the Victorian Comprehensive Cancer Centre and Parkville Integrated Palliative Care Service, lead by Dr Stacey Panozzo, investigated the characteristics and medicinal cannabis requests of 1700 patients with breast, colorectal, melanoma and oesophageal cancer patients attending the three centres over a six month period in 2018-2019.

The study was also featured in this Limbic Oncology article.

Continue reading

Putting the CAR-T before the horse?

Dr Benjamin Thomas’s excellent thread about economic justice for palliative care patients in the context of the announcement of a likely announcement regarding the Government funding around 200-250 patients for $500,000 each to receive CAR-T treatment.

He calculates what we could do for palliative care patients with the same money.

Worth a read! Thanks Ben @andiyarus

https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/1222006604289101824.html

 

 

Announcement re CAR-T funding

 

Advance care planning survey for health professionals in Australia

Message from Advance Care Planning Australia:

 

Are you a doctor, nurse, social worker or allied health professional working with people affected by cancer?  We need your help to better understand the barriers and enablers of advance care planning for people with cancer.

Advance Care Planning Australia, supported by funding by Cancer Australia, is leading research to help more Australians affected by cancer to access the benefits of advance care planning.

Participation is easy and requires only 15 minutes of your time to complete an online survey. With your involvement we can help more people with cancer to receive care consistent with their values, goals and preferences.

Survey: http://bit.ly/2Cm44Es

Inspired to improve your communication skills?

 Cancer Council WA delivers the very successful workshop on communication skills training, perfect for the situations described in our article earlier today.

For more information in WA see here

Cancer Council Victoria also has a variety of education and communication workshops and resources.

Know a great resource for communication skills? Comment below.

Continue reading

AusDoc article – Dying doctor has some lessons on how to tell patients bad news

I have shamelessly reposted from AusDoc and therefore some readers may not be able to see this behind the paywall – if so I do apologise!

As a doctor of almost 40 years, US internal medicine specialist Dr Ron Naito started to suspect he may have pancreatic cancer from his symptoms and test results.

Dr Ron Naito
Dr Ron Naito. Photo: Vimeo

But his own doctors made such a poor job of telling him the diagnosis, that he’s devoting his final months of life to teaching students the skills of delivering bad news.

“When doctors deliver bad news to their patients, every word carries meaning, and you need to choose your words very wisely. We can and must do better at this. All doctors can learn these skills, and the good news is that there are now excellent training programs available to support them.”

For more reading see here.

Sonia

#advancecareplanning seminar in Melbourne 9 August

Featuring not one but two Palliverse tweeps, @csinclair28 and @sonialf, this seminar at Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in central Melbourne, Australia will be of interest to the healthcare sector including aged care and acute care.

Well-coordinated and appropriate person-centred care is a key priority. It’s becoming increasingly important for the healthcare sector to better understand advance care planning, which supports an individual’s values, goals and preferences.

Presented by Advance Care Planning Australiathe Department of Health and Human Servicesthe Office of the Public Advocate and Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, this Melbourne-based Victorian seminar will be run by recognised leaders in the field of advance care planning in Australia. To find out more about the program, see the agenda here.

The topics covered include advance care planning across sectors, legal considerations and local initiatives. The event is recommended for professionals leading and implementing advance care planning in health services, residential aged care and primary care.

Venue: Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre – Lecture Theatre B, 305 Grattan Street, Melbourne VIC 3000.

Date: Friday, 9 August 2019, 9:00am – 4:30pm. Registration and refreshments start at 8:00am.

Program: see the agenda here.

Cost: $100 (including GST).

Catering: Included in the ticket price.

Registration

Register on Eventbrite here.

Registration closes Friday 26 July 2019 at 9pm AEST.

 

Caring@home seeks translators – Vietnamese and Tagalog

caring@home project – seeking translators

The caring@home (www.caringathomeproject.com.au) project is looking for palliative medicine specialists or trainees to review some resources for carers being translated into Vietnamese and Tagalog.  caring@home has produced resources for carers to support carers to help manage breakthrough symptoms safely using subcutaneous medicines.

A company that uses accredited translators have been contracted to do the work but the project has also requested the opportunity to have a health care professional, who is a native speaker of the language, to review the translation and subtitles.

The work would be expected to be completed in May and June. They are able to offer a stipend for this work of $800 + GST upon receipt of an invoice.

The work is to review the following after they come back from the translating service:

If you are interested in undertaking this work, please contact Karen Cooper, Project Manager for caring@home on E: Karen.Cooper3@health.qld.gov.au or M: 0428 422 818.

Immunotherapy Symptoms Clinical Trials: a new paradigm Melbourne Wed 12th June

Would you like to learn more about immunotherapy use and trials in cancer and in palliative care?

Immunotherapy Symptoms Clinical Trials: a new paradigm forum

Palliative, supportive and cancer care professionals are invited to attend the VCCC and CST co-hosted Immunotherapy Symptoms Clinical Trials: a new paradigm forum to progress clinical trials concepts in this evolving oncology field, recognise achievements, celebrate success and make connections for future directions. 

Palliative care progress and achievements

The VCCC Building Trial Group Capability Program initial investment is focused on developing the palliative care group as a key priority area. The group’s development and activities have been underway for more than 12 months; it is timely to celebrate progress and achievements.

Here is a program for the day

Registrations are now open for the palliative care sessions in the afternoon. Please note you will need to register for morning and afternoon sessions separately.