ANZSPM position on medicinal cannabis

ANZSPM criticises failure to consult on medicinal cannabis

The Australian and New Zealand Society of Palliative Medicine (ANZSPM) is calling for improved consultation with end-of-life care experts after yesterday’s Senate decision on medicinal cannabis.

ANZSPM President, Dr Carol Douglas FAChPM, expressed concern that the decision will have ramifications for both patient and practitioner protections:

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2017 ANZSPM Aotearoa Annual Conference and AGM

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We at Palliverse love a conference, especially one that “brings together doctors working in palliative care” in Aotearoa/New Zealand.

The 2017 ANZSPM Aotearoa Annual Conference and AGM will be held in Christchurch this year. It all starts off with the Trainee Day on 11/08/17 which is open to all Palliative Medicine trainees, General Practitioners with a special interest in Palliative Care and Medical officers working in Palliative Care.

The 2017 Annual Education Update Programme is packed with many topics of interest, and will be a good opportunity to catch up with what is going on all over the country, as well as catching up with new and old friends. This year Dr Wendy Pattemore will be introducing a new session called, “Wild Successes and Fabulous Failures,” which will provide an opportunity to share how Palliative Care is done in your own ‘patch’.

To register you can either use this 2017 Annual Education Days and Trainee Day Registration Form or register via the website. Attendees must be ANZSPM members. Our friends from Australia are always very welcome!

For my reflections from the 2015 ANZSPM Aotearoa conference, click here.

Funeral services in Australia: Moves toward greater clarity at a time of great vulnerability

When you think about funerals, what is the first thing that comes to mind?

It may be a favourite scene from ‘Six Feet Under’ – the cult TV drama series depicting a family-run funeral home in Los Angeles. Or, it might be an iconic image of those prominent funeral companies that can seem to dominate the industry. If, however, you are currently in the throes of organising a funeral – chances are you may not really know what to think, or where to go in terms of navigating this very difficult passage of time.

As a social worker or nurse working in palliative care, you may be unsure of what resources are available to help support families’ decision making during a time of mourning. That’s where a novel funeral home comparison site can be of great assistance – you may find what you are looking for Gathered Here.

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#CrazySocks4Docs on June 1st

 

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Crazy Socks for Docs – by Dr Eric Levi @DrEricLevi

June 1st. #CrazySocks4Docs. But not just for Docs only. This day is for nurses, dentists, pharmacists, social workers, physiotherapists, psychologists, dietitians, speech pathologists, audiologists, respiratory therapists, anaesthesia techs, paramedics, medical students, veterinarians and all other specialties that work in the health care industry for patients. Continue reading

I think therefore I am? – A definition of Grace

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http://www.flickr.com/photos/144232185@N03/30117339256″>PARMIGIANINO,1534-35 – Deux Canéphores se donnant la Main (Louvre INV6466)

In healthcare it is important to set clear boundaries in order to care for yourself and your patients in a sustainable fashion. In the practice of palliative care, boundary setting is even more important, as the therapeutic relationship can be very intense and intimate at times. We have to keep in mind that this relationship will likely end soon, with the death of our patient. It can be a difficult balancing act; using your humanity to make important connections with another human being; while at the same time keeping professional distance to protect the both of you.

That being said, it is inevitable that there will be some cases which will hit you harder than others. When a deeper connection has been made, you will feel the loss and grief much more strongly. Informal reflection with your team members and professional supervision have an important role to play in keeping us palliative care providers safe to continue doing the important job that we have to do. We need to remind ourselves that this is a job that not everyone in healthcare can handle. That those of us who chose to work in palliative care, owe it to ourselves and our patients to look after ourselves. We are a precious resource and if we do not take care of ourselves, we will deny our patients and their families the difference that we can make in their lives, and deaths.

After almost ten years of working exclusively in full-time palliative care practice I would like to share a case that reminded me of just how human I am, and how much value I obtain from professional supervision and from sharing with my team members.

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Palace of Care – Living every moment

Living every moment when you’re dying

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In New Zealand last week we celebrated Hospice Awareness Weak and to tell you the truth I’m not sure how impactful the week actually was. Continue reading

Pushing up daisies

I learned a few new euphemisms for dying in this Conversation article. Confession time – it’s kind of my job to use the “D” word but even I, as a palliative care doctor, can find it awkward. But if we hide behind phrases like “passed away”, “gone” or “lost”, we contribute to confusion in some and participate in death denying.

 

wordmap.dying.wordsIf health professionals use euphemisms, they need to consider whether patients really understand what they’re trying to say. The article concludes that “Euphemisms have their place. But being able to talk openly (and clearly) about death and dying is important as it helps normalise death and avoids confusion.”

Happy palliative care week!

Sonia

Dying to talk?

Palliative Care Australia brings you this youtube video which you can share with patients, families and friends…

Jean Kittson says it’s important to complete the Dying to Talk Discussion Starter and encourages you to speak to your loved ones about your end-of-life care wishes.

If you make any advance care plans, bonus points for documenting something in writing it and sharing it with your substitute decision maker, your MyHealthRecord, your  GP and local hospital!

 

Welcome to #NPCW17

“You matter, your care matters,” was the key message from his Excellency Sir Peter Cosgrove, Governor-General of Australia in declaring National Palliative Care Week 2017 open today.  Palliverse was lucky enough to be in attendance for the event held on a stunning Canberra Autumn morning at Government House.

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NPCW17 at Government House

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12th Asia Pacific Hospice Conference – early bird registration extended

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Merlion & Marina Bay Sands – photo c/o E Campbell

We at Palliverse love a conference, especially one that “brings together workers, supporters and friends of hospice and palliative care” in the Asia-Pacific region. This year’s Asia Pacific Hospice Conference (APHC), with the theme “Greater Than the Sum of Its Parts”, will be held in Singapore from July 26th to 29th. Early bird registration has been extended until May 29th. The conference programme is now available, and there are a number of pre-conference workshops and site visits, as well as sessions in Mandarin.  For more information, visit the conference website.

For Team Palliverse reflections on the last APHC in Taipei, click here.