Integrated Palliative Care – what does this mean in 2017?

The team at @Palliverse are huge fans of Prof Jenny Philip, an inspirational speaker and all round wise and skilled person!

Come along to Monday Lunch (it’s a good lunch) next week and see Jenny share her thoughts on

Monday Lunch Live with Prof Jennifer Philip

8th May 2017

The Role of Integrated Palliative Medicine in Best Cancer Care

Victorian Comprehensive Cancer Centre

Lecture Theatre B, Level 7

305 Grattan St, Melbourne, VIC 3000

Book Now : come along, catch up live via webinar, or later when you have time. 

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#PALLANZ October tweetchat: Euthanasia and palliative care

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I have seen few topics that can simultaneously enliven a dinner party conversation and create such moral divides as the debate about euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. Conversation increases in volume and speed. Wine glasses are clutched tightly to chests. Slippery slopes, autonomy, choice, sanctities and human rights to life and death are bandied across the room. Other party-goers are drawn in, almost against their will.

While this dinner party conversation may eventually give way to renovations or school holiday plans, the public debate continues.

Perhaps it takes hold so readily because we all share such a deep stake in the issue. Whether committed to autonomous, communitarian, religious, ideological or professional positions, we are all part of a broader community, sharing a common experience of human life and death.

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#ANZSPM16 tweet chat: the (hidden) cost of caring

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A game changer at the recent Australian and New Zealand Society of Palliative medicine 2016 Conference (#ANZSPM16) was Dr Merryn Gott’s plenary presentation on the hidden costs of caring. Little is known about the financial impact of caring for people at the end of life.

She detailed some powerful anecdotes, including the story of two sisters whose mother lay dying in a hospital. The cost of parking was prohibitive and the daughters took it in turns to sit in the car watching out for the parking inspector. When their mother died, only one of the daughters was there; the other was in the car. Continue reading

August #PALLANZ tweetchat – Funerals

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Robert Larkins, in his book Funeral Rights explains how “…in a little over 80 years, it has become the norm in Australia for a person to die in an institution and for strangers to collect the body and spirit it away to some mysterious and inaccessible mortuary.” He ascribes this transition to a combination of complex legislation, inadequate community awareness and in some cases, exploitation by those in the ‘death-care’ industry.

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ANZSPM 2016 – Latest evidence on medical cannabis in palliative care

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Cannabis is a plant which produces a large number of potentially useful chemical compounds. Patients have figured this out and are far ahead of the medical establishment in their understanding of how to use the plant. Palliative care and other health providers have to rapidly catch up with the necessary research, and in the meantime work with patients as partners as we learn.

If you want to learn more about the basic physiology and pharmacology of cannabinoids, the therapeutic evidence for cannabinoids, or hear about the international experience with prescription cannabinoids – join the Australia and New Zealand Society of Palliative Medicine Conference to be held in Perth on the 8th -11th  September 2016.

#ANZSPM16 will feature two presenters on medical cannabis including International Keynote Dr Pippa Hawley from British Colombia Cancer Agency’s Pain & Symptom Management/Palliative Care Program and Dr Maureen Mitchell.

For some good bedtime reading on this topic ahead of #ANZSPM16, check out this recent review of cannabinoids for medical use & please share below if you’re aware of other good literature on this topic!

@palliverse

#ANZSPM16 – understanding demoralisation in palliative care

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Demoralisation has been described as a form of psychological distress that is associated with hopelessness, helplessness, and a loss of meaning and purpose. It has been explored across a number of settings, but is thought to be particularly important in palliative care settings, where it may affect up to 20% of patients who face end-stage disease.

Such a pattern of distress goes to the core of our identity, and presents challenges to well-being and the often-cited idea of ‘living well until we die’. It also has important implications for decision-making and consent in relation to medical treatments.

Practitioners in palliative care understand the far-reaching impact of demoralisation, and Professor David Kissane, along with colleagues at Monash University have been advancing our understanding of this concept Continue reading

Upcoming #PEDPC #PallANZ Tweetchat

Palliative Care Needs of Children & Adolescents

This month, we are excited to explore how palliative care can help to support young people in our community living with serious illness! Our upcoming #PALLANZ tweetchat to be held at 7pm (AEST) on Thursday 30th June will discuss topics related to the palliative care needs of children and adolescents and their families. We will also be featuring some guest blogs from new Palliverse Contributors working with young people in Paediatric Palliative Care (#pedpc).

During our #PALLANZ tweetchat, we hope to bring together those interested to talk about how a kid’s #pedpc service can help young people with serious illness to live well; when a young person might meet the #pedpc team; and where they might like to receive care. We’ll also imagine we have a magic wand able to do anything we want to improve the available supports and share these ideas and other helpful resources!

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#PALLANZ tweet chat: Palliative Care Yarning

PallANZ 201603 altPalliverse acknowledges the traditional custodians of the lands on which we live, and we pay respect to Elders past and present. We also acknowledge the important contribution of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to Australian society.

The delivery of high-quality, culturally sensitive and respectful palliative care services to Indigenous communities is critically important. In the Australian context, a recent press release from NACCHO highlights some of the key issues, including the need to partner with Indigenous communities to develop and implement culturally appropriate services.

In the spirit of respectful, inclusive communication and ongoing learning, we invite you to join us for an online “Palliative Care Yarning” tweet-chat on 31st March 2016. This tweet-chat will be an opportunity to discuss some key issues in palliative care for Indigenous and First Nation peoples, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia.

When? Thursday, 31st March 2016

  • 4:00pm AWST Perth
  • 5:30pm ACST Darwin
  • 6:00pm AEST Brisbane
  • 6:30pm ACDT Adelaide
  • 7:00pm AEDT Canberra, Sydney, Melbourne, Hobart
  • 9:00pm Wellington, Auckland, Christchruch

What? Topics for discussion:

  • T1 What does high quality Indigenous palliative care mean to you?
  • T2 How can we improve equity in palliative care delivery to Indigenous communities across remote, regional and urban settings?
  • T3 How can existing services collaborate with Indigenous communities in palliative care? (eg training, advocacy, service delivery)
  • T4 How will the services of the future deliver high quality Indigenous palliative care?

As always, we ask that you include the topic tag (e.g. T1) in your response to each topic, and include the #PALLANZ hashtag in your response. As the #PALLANZ community is international, we respectfully encourage use of the term ‘Indigenous people’ where referring to Indigenous and First Nations people and communities from across the world during the tweet-chat. The @Palliverse moderator for this tweet-chat (@csinclair28) will be responsive to any specific requests or feedback from participants regarding appropriate and respectful language.

You don’t have to be an expert, a Twitter whiz, or even live in Australia or New Zealand to join – in fact, we strongly encourage those new to Twitter and from beyond our shores to join us and share your views!

For those new to Twitter check out our tutorial here.

Looking forward to talking soon.

Community members wanted

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We want you! (By James Montgomery Flagg via Wikipedia)

We are looking for community members to join our team at Palliverse.

If you are interested in palliative care and would like to contribute to our work here at Palliverse, we would love to hear from you! We are seeking individuals who do not directly work in palliative care, and are keen to invite current, past and future consumers (e.g. patients, carers, family or friend) to come on board. Personal experience with palliative care is welcome but not essential. Prior participation in community advocacy or representation is not required – but sharing our goals and values is a must!  Continue reading

Periscope – the latest #SoMe for spreading the Palliative Care message?

Has anyone tried Periscope, the new live-streaming video app from Twitter? I used it earlier this week to watch an interview via health journalist (and all round social media star @croakeyblog) Melissa Sweet’s Periscope account. I’m unsure of the potential of this new app at the moment (it could be a great medium for the #thickenedliquidchallenge) but will try it out this weekend when I’m in Melbourne for the Medicine Social health and social media event. (Palliverse’s own Sonia Fullerton is one of the speakers.) You can watch live or on replay for 24 hours after the event.

If you’d like to play along, you can download the app here and follow @palliverse (and @Elissa_Campbell while you’re at it). I think it’s only for iOS at this stage – sorry Android users.