#ANZSPM16 – understanding demoralisation in palliative care

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Demoralisation has been described as a form of psychological distress that is associated with hopelessness, helplessness, and a loss of meaning and purpose. It has been explored across a number of settings, but is thought to be particularly important in palliative care settings, where it may affect up to 20% of patients who face end-stage disease.

Such a pattern of distress goes to the core of our identity, and presents challenges to well-being and the often-cited idea of ‘living well until we die’. It also has important implications for decision-making and consent in relation to medical treatments.

Practitioners in palliative care understand the far-reaching impact of demoralisation, and Professor David Kissane, along with colleagues at Monash University have been advancing our understanding of this concept Continue reading