Elsewhere in the Palliverse – Weekend Reads

photo by David Mao itsdavo

I hope you enjoy this selection of articles (and some links to photos and videos) about palliative care, research and related topics. If you make it to the bottom, I’m interested to know what you think of the last link. Please share your thoughts, and any recommendations, in the comments section.

  • “Why is so difficult to prognositicate?” asks neurologist Jules Montague, examining cases of poor prognostication throughout history. (Why doctors get it wrong, The Guardian UK)
  • Team Palliverse still have a place in our heart for textbooks, and we love it even more when their editors write blog posts. To mark the release of the fifth edition of the Oxford Textbook of Palliative Medicine, the OUP blog is publishing a 3-part series titled “Facing the challenges of palliative care”. Part 1 (Continuity) and Part 2 (Development) are available now. (Oxford University Press)

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Elsewhere in the Palliverse – Weekend Reads

I have so many links to share with you. Here are a few of them:

Australian critical care doctor and blogger Andy W writes about death and taxes and asks, “…why is it that we seem to spend so much time talking about the taxes, and not nearly enough about death?” Thought-provoking stuff. “The Things That Are Certain“, The Flying PhD

Death isn’t failure. But avoiding these conversations is.” UK Palliative Care Physician Katherine Sleeman shares her story in this beautiful piece, “While medicine gets better, dying gets worse: Doctors are so good at saving lives that we forget about death.” (The Independent UK) Continue reading

Elsewhere in the Palliverse – Weekend Reads

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(Another beautiful day in Apollo Bay)

Conversations that Count Day took place across New Zealand this week (on April 16th). Read a selection of the various conversations and discussions generated around this event hereherehere, here, here and here.

At the same time, the US National Healthcare Decision Day promoted similar conversations across the pacific. An excellent collection of resources from Pallimed can be found here.

The Victorian Auditor-General’s Office released its report on the provision of palliative care services in the state this week. It’s findings and recommendations are both heartening and  worrying. Mainstream and palliative care media responses can be found here and here.

The Australian Medical Association also released its position statement on Palliative Approach in Residential Aged Care Facilities earlier this week.

Many of us love a great TED talk. Haven’t heard of them? Or simply looking for a few more to feed your addiction? Check out this playlist on “New ways to think about death”.

A few reflective pieces to fill your head and heart this weekend:

And finally, here’s another plug for our new fellow survey.

Have a lovely weekend everyone!

Elsewhere in the Palliverse – weekend reads

weekendreads

I’d recommend the current issues of New Philospher (#7: Health) and Quarterly Essay (#57: Dear Life) for some palliative care-related reading. If you can’t make it to the book shop here are some online reads:

Truly beautiful words – Before I Go: A Stanford neurosurgeon’s parting wisdom about life and time. (The Washington Post)

EAPC has a new blog series from the patient and carer perspective! (Palliative Stories, EAPC Blog)

The Trouble With Advance Directives. (NY Times)

A doctor discovers an important question patients should be asked. (Washington Post)

When doing everything is way too much. (NY Times) Continue reading

Elsewhere in the Palliverse – Weekend Reads

Has anyone watched Atul Gawande’s Being Mortal series for Frontline in the US? There’s also a selection of shorter videos at the Frontline YouTube page, like the one above.

Oliver Sacks has written a beautiful piece in the New York Times, about his reaction to being diagnosed with a life-limiting illness. (My Own Life: Oliver Sacks On Learning He Has Terminal Cancer) Continue reading

Elsewhere in the Palliverse: Weekend Reads

Hi and welcome to the first “Elsewhere in the Palliverse” for 2015. There is an (unintentional) geriatric flavour to this week’s links. This is possibly because today marks the end of a six-month geriatrics rotation for me, or maybe because another year has ended and birthday has passed. Regardless, I hope that Palliverse readers enjoy the following links:

Dementia researchers Muireann Irish and Rebekah Ahmed give their take on the new film adaptation of Still Alice, a novel about a 50 year old woman who is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. Have you read the book? Will you see the movie? (Still Alice: A rare look at how dementia steals memories from millions – The Conversation)

Professor Rod McLeod gives some background on his article in this month’s European Journal of Palliative Care, ‘Making it easier to die at home – an innovative programme in New South Wales, Australia’. (Making it easier to die at home – EAPC Blog)

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Elsewhere in the Palliverse – holiday addition

If you’re lucky enough to have a break over the summer holiday season, I would advise that you to avoid anything work-related. However, if you just can’t pull yourself away from the worlds of palliative care and research, here (in no particular order) are some related links:

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Elsewhere in the Palliverse – social media edition

Social media is a broad term that includes all sorts of online platforms and interactions, from the blogs* I follow (and share) via my RSS reader, to Youtube videos, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, slideshare and beyond.  This week’s “Elsewhere in the Palliverse” visits the intersection of social media, palliative care and research.

*including palliverse.com, of course!

 

Elsewhere in the Palliverse – weekend reads

Gratuitous holiday snap unrelated to post

Gratuitous holiday snap unrelated to post

I’ll be spending the weekend enjoying the sunshine reminiscing over holiday snaps catching up with tweets from #CancerCongress, #PPCConference, #COSA2014 working on an ethics proposal. If you’re looking for something to do, try this reading list.

Elsewhere in the Palliverse – Weekend Reads (featuring zombies)

Here’s some palliative care and research related links to peruse in the week ahead (most found via Twitter):

ABC News interviews Atul Gawande about “modern medicine’s treatment of dying patients.” Dr Gawande is all over social media and the news, even in Australia (and in Legoland)!

Current and former Chairs of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists Mortality Sub-Committee write in The Age about the challenges that not for resuscitation orders can pose for anaesthetists.

The ASCO Post reviews a review article from JAMA Internal Medicine, about end-of-life discussions and advanced care planning. In summary, it’s all good.

In Canada’s Globe & Mail, “End-of-life patients aren’t being heard“.

Geriatrician Louise Aronson writes in The Lancet about ageism in medicine, and ageing as “the human life-cycle’s neglected step-child.”

Presenting at a conference? Improve your presentation with zombie apocalypse principles.

Meanwhile, on October 31st, GeriPal explored the unmet palliative care needs of zombies. And check out the zombie pain scale!

Finally, join the weekly (zombie-free) #hpmglobal tweetchat on Monday (17/11/14 at 11pm AEDT) to discuss an article from BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care about support networks of end-of-life carers. #hpmglobal chat is hosted by Aussie ex-pat Dr Jim Cleary (@jfclearywisc), with participants from several continents. For instruction in how to participate in a tweetchat, see Sonia’s post Twitter 102.

I hope you enjoy these and stay safe from zombies!

 

Elissa