An open letter to Victorians on #PalliativeCare #VAD #euthanasia

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PC clinician open letter Final

#17APCC – Death Over Drinks, aged care, Maggie Beer & more

One sign of a good conference is when weeks after the conference (and beyond), it  inspires you and changes your practice. The Australian Palliative Care Conference closed in Adelaide more than two weeks ago and I am still digesting the (at-times challenging) content from the plenary sessions, panels and breakout presentations.

If you were unable to attend the conference, or would like to revisit the many excellent presentations and themes, luckily Marie McInerney from Croakey was there to provide excellent reporting, with ten articles about the conference. You can even catch up on the conference tweets in her reports (including some from Team Palliverse).

Catch up at the Croakey site (and keep reading for the rest of their excellent Australian health coverage).

PS See you in Perth for #19APCC!

Latest developments on assisted dying: ICEL conference, Halifax 2017

So the last few days has been interesting for me. As GoGently Australia launched their latest campaign to advocate for assisted dying legislation, I’ve been removed from the public response in Australia, while attending the ICEL conference in Halifax. It’s been a great chance to hear about recent developments in Canada, and reflect on the data and some of the ‘lived experiences’ of practitioners, family members and patients, which has emerged through recent research.

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I think therefore I am? – A thought provoking interview with Cory Taylor

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Photo by Britt Reints, used via creative commons

Driving to work on Saturday morning I listened to RNZ National’s Kim Hill interviewing celebrated Australian novelist Cory Taylor. Cory talked about the experiences that led to her writing her last book, Dying: a Memoir (Text Publishing), while dying of metastatic melanoma with brain metastases. Topics discussed include Euthanasia, Palliative Care, and writing about dying.

You can listen to the RNZ National interview here.

I think therefore I am? – Its a small world after all.

 

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Photo by Sid Mosdell, taken on March 28, 2012

Over the years I have been privileged to share some meals with a visiting Lama from the Tibetan Buddhist Faith. Rinpoche is based in Scottsdale, Arizona, USA but regularly visits New Zealand. Dinners with Rinpoche are always very interesting and he has many stories to tell. Given my own professional interests, the topic of death and dying often comes up. During one of those conversations Rinpoche shared a related story about one of his late American friends.

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Denton lacks understanding of dying process – a social worker’s perspective

Euthanasia machine, displayed in Science Museum, London

Euthanasia machine, displayed in Science Museum, London

There has been much discussion about physician assisted death in the Australian media in recent weeks. Most of the voices have belonged to doctors (eg this one, this one, this one or this one) or Andrew Denton, with little airtime given to people with life-limiting illness, their family members, bereaved carers, or other professionals who care for the dying. We are sharing an opinion from an invaluable member of the palliative care interdisciplinary team, the social worker.

Below, palliative care Social Worker Zoe Mitchell responds to Andrew Denton’s recent article in The Age (“Doctors shouldn’t look away when dying patients are suffering“). Denton claims that according to palliative care philosophy, “while it is ethically unacceptable for a patient to choose a death that is quick and painless, it is ethically acceptable for them to choose a slow, painful death by dehydration and starvation.”

Zoe says, “I had so much respect for Andrew Denton until now. His article is full of false information about palliative care and shows a lack of understanding of the dying process.

I am no doctor, but I have spent over 4 years working with people who were dying, and while to us it may feel like we are ‘starving’ someone…we are not. When someone is dying and the body begins to shut down, it does not need food or fluids. If we force feed someone it can cause more discomfort and possible nausea and vomiting. If we force fluids into someone and their kidneys are shutting down, it just adds to their fluid overload – again causing discomfort, with fluid in the lungs and swollen limbs. Instead of forcing fluids and food on people with no appetite or thirst, we should be providing quality mouth care to ensure they do not have a dry or sore mouth.

The focus needs to be on good care, this is why we have palliative care. To provide holistic support to the dying person, the important people in their lives and the medical teams looking after them, but also to educate them on what a “good death” can look like.

Before we can even discuss the debate of voluntary euthanasia we need to bring the conversation back to how we can support people to not just die well, but live well until death. In order to do this we need more funding and resources to ensure good palliative care is accessible no matter where you live or your socioeconomic status.”

What are your views about Denton’s article, and nutrition and hydration at end of life? Regardless of your personal views on physician-assisted death, do you think he offers a fair depiction of palliative care? Please share below.

Many thanks to Zoe for contributing to the discussion.

Engaging with uncomfortable dialogue – Demystifying palliative care

Like many of you I was glued to Q&A last night.  The topic was “Facing Death”
and the discussion pivoted around the panel’s view around the right or otherwise of Australians to have access to euthanasia.

Needless to say the twittersphere was running hot,  but clear to a number of commentators was that many were poorly informed about the topics at hand.  From my perspective one of the most concerning issues was a lack of understanding about what palliative care is and assumptions that it is on some level the same as euthanasia.

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Elsewhere in the Palliverse…weekend reads

Reads for your weekend from across the Palliverse…

How to determine the order of authorship in an academic paper (@paulisci)

Presenting your research findings at a meeting? Here are some useful tips to improve your delivery (Lifehacker)

As I walk through hospital corridors, I’m always grateful for the beautiful artworks displayed. However, I don’t often stop to consider the themes portrayed. Art columnist Jonathon Jones asks, Should hospital art be jolly – or should it portray the truth about pain? (The Guardian). Meanwhile, More hospitals use the healing power of art (Wall Street Journal). What are your thoughts? Continue reading