A reflection on voluntary assisted dying and conscientious objection

Dying sculture

[Image by rmac8oppo from pixabay]

[The following essay by Dr Adrian Dabscheck, an experienced palliative care physician in Melbourne, explores the evolution of our society’s views towards death and reflects on the role of palliative care and voluntary assisted dying in this context – Chi]

During a recent period of enforced rest, I had time to reflect on my attitude to the recently enacted voluntary assisted dying legislation in Victoria and consider my response.I will detail my reaction to the Act and why I have chosen to become a so-called conscientious objector.

In his essay Western Attitudes Toward Death,French historian Philippe Ariès illustrates the evolution of our attitudes to death.

Initially, and for millennia, there had been a general resignation to the destiny of our species for which he used the phrase, Et moriemur, and we shall all die. This was replaced in the twelfth century by the more modern concept of the importance of one’s self, and he used the phrase, la mort de soi, one’s own death.  Continue reading

An open letter to Victorians on #PalliativeCare #VAD #euthanasia

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PC clinician open letter Final

Latest developments on assisted dying: ICEL conference, Halifax 2017

So the last few days has been interesting for me. As GoGently Australia launched their latest campaign to advocate for assisted dying legislation, I’ve been removed from the public response in Australia, while attending the ICEL conference in Halifax. It’s been a great chance to hear about recent developments in Canada, and reflect on the data and some of the ‘lived experiences’ of practitioners, family members and patients, which has emerged through recent research.

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