Elsewhere in the Palliverse: Weekend Reads

Hi and welcome to the first “Elsewhere in the Palliverse” for 2015. There is an (unintentional) geriatric flavour to this week’s links. This is possibly because today marks the end of a six-month geriatrics rotation for me, or maybe because another year has ended and birthday has passed. Regardless, I hope that Palliverse readers enjoy the following links:

Dementia researchers Muireann Irish and Rebekah Ahmed give their take on the new film adaptation of Still Alice, a novel about a 50 year old woman who is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. Have you read the book? Will you see the movie? (Still Alice: A rare look at how dementia steals memories from millions – The Conversation)

Professor Rod McLeod gives some background on his article in this month’s European Journal of Palliative Care, ‘Making it easier to die at home – an innovative programme in New South Wales, Australia’. (Making it easier to die at home – EAPC Blog)

Continue reading

Elsewhere in the Palliverse – weekend reads

Gratuitous holiday snap unrelated to post

Gratuitous holiday snap unrelated to post

I’ll be spending the weekend enjoying the sunshine reminiscing over holiday snaps catching up with tweets from #CancerCongress, #PPCConference, #COSA2014 working on an ethics proposal. If you’re looking for something to do, try this reading list.

Elsewhere in the Palliverse – reading list

This TED Talk “How Not To Be Ignorant About the World” by Dr Hans Rosling (@HansRosling – Swedish medical doctor, statistician and Professor of International Health) and his son Ola Rosling is an entertaining and eye-opening look at how our biases and intuition lead to misconceptions. (For the record, I vote like a Swede – not a chimp.)

The beautiful poem Japanese Maple by the Clive James (written while he is dying) has been all over my social media feeds this week. Here’s The Guardian‘s take on why it’s resonating with people.

Bioethicist Ezekiel Emanuel writes in the Atlantic on Why I Hope to Die at 75. And here’s a rebuttal from Alex Smith at GeriPal.

Making a case for the integration of palliative care in policies on ageing and dementia – a European perspective (EAPC Blog)

More on dementia – Ageism and death anxiety (ehospice UK)

In Australia: Call for a Royal Commission into Nursing Home Care (ABC Radio National)

And a more positive look at residential aged care: A Nursing Home Can Be a New Beginning (Adele Horin)

An interview with the Groundswell Project (Dying Wishes – Australian Ageing Agenda)

The NHS (UK) has an End of Life Guidance app! (iTunes store)

The Institute of Medicine (US) released a report entitled “Dying in America: Improving Quality and Honoring Individual Preferences Near the End of Life.” There’s been a lot of discussion about it on palliative care social media and the mainstream media over the past week. Pallimed has a nice summary.

Terminally ill, but constantly hospitalised. (NPR)

Many Palliverse readers would be able to relate to this – The reality of nurses completing their own research (EAPC Blog)

If you haven’t already, consider signing the Montreal Declaration for palliative care (AHPCA Blog)

Also consider crowdfunding Little Stars, a movie about paediatric palliative care.

 

 

Elsewhere in the Palliverse – weekend reads

The recent death of comedian Joan Rivers has brought end-of-life issues to the forefront. Kübler-Ross collaborator David Kessler wrote a piece in the Huffington Post on “Melissa Rivers’ Courageous Decision” to take her mother “off life support”. He gives advice to families going through the same decision-making process. Joan Rivers’ funeral plans, which she wrote about in a 2012 book, have also been getting wide coverage in the mainstream media. (Huffington Post, USA Today, news.com.au)

Nicholas Talley, President of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians (home to the Australasian Chapter of Palliative Medicine and therefore all palliative medicine specialists and trainees in Australia and New Zealand) has called for Australian governments to invest in and support further clinical trials into the benefits and risks of medicinal cannabis. In his piece for The Age, he speaks of humanity, compassion, patient-centred care and evidence-based medicine. (The Age)

Continue reading

Elsewhere in the Palliverse…weekend reads

Reads for your weekend from across the Palliverse…

How to determine the order of authorship in an academic paper (@paulisci)

Presenting your research findings at a meeting? Here are some useful tips to improve your delivery (Lifehacker)

As I walk through hospital corridors, I’m always grateful for the beautiful artworks displayed. However, I don’t often stop to consider the themes portrayed. Art columnist Jonathon Jones asks, Should hospital art be jolly – or should it portray the truth about pain? (The Guardian). Meanwhile, More hospitals use the healing power of art (Wall Street Journal). What are your thoughts? Continue reading