Palace of Care – A Reluctant Patient

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I first met our reluctant patient in the outpatient clinic with his girlfriend. It had taken a number of phone calls before he would come in for assessment. He was scared of hospice and had resisted his Oncologist referring him to us. He didn’t know what we were about and what he didn’t know frightened him.

He had been unwell with cancer for over a year with severe pain making him unable to sit or lie down for more than an hour at a time. Sleep was difficult for him and he was woken up several times a night by burning pain that spread down his right leg. He wasn’t keen on any changes in medication, and it took much negotiation for him to allow us to increase the doses of the pain relief agents he was already taking. He didn’t want to consider anything new, just yet. As his pain was so severe I offered to admit him into the inpatient unit but he wanted to stay at home.

Over the next month, his pain did improve but any relief would only last for a few days at best. We again offered to admit him for pain control but he still wasn’t ready. Some weeks later the pain had worsened bringing tears to his eyes. His mother and girlfriend were exhausted and felt helpless as they couldn’t help reduce hisWith encouragement from his mother and girlfriend he agreed to be admitted.

We started him on a different opioid that afternoon. The next morning he was full of smiles. He told us he was pain-free for the first time in two years. He stayed a few more days as we helped him with other issues, and then he went home. As well as good pain control we had built a trusting relationship that would help during his next admissions.

Palace of Care – Hold On

Photo by Hu Chen on Unsplash

We’d been trying to admit her for weeks, but she had not been keen. We had her on the admission list for a whole week but she said that she had to sort out something for her children and couldn’t come in. I thought that it might be an excuse, as a lot of people are still scared of hospice. Most people have not had anything to do with hospice but they may have some pre-conceived idea of what hospice might be. Often this is inaccurate, and can generate a lot of fear.

It took some convincing by the hospital palliative care team before she would finally agree to coming in to hospice. She was still nervous but her favourite cousin had promised that she would go in with her. They had grown up together and they were best friends, but this had been taken to a completely different level once the cancer diagnosis had been made five months ago. Something was wrong as she had lost a lot of weight, without trying to. Life had been busy for many years with her five children, and her partner could not always be counted upon. It was her cousin who had attended all the Oncology appointments with her. Her cousin had been there for all the chemotherapy sessions. Having her cousin accompany her to hospice was comforting and if there was anything scary, she would be there for her.

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