Elsewhere in the Palliverse – Weekend Reads

photo by David Mao itsdavo

This week’s reading list features stories from around the globe.

Telehealth helps to facilitate home-based palliative care in Taiwan, in one of a series of EAPC blogposts about palliative care in SE Asia (Cloud-based platform for palliative care at home)

Tailored care for older patients with cancer in Latin America: an imminent challenge (British Geriatrics Society blog)

“Although it is unrealistic to believe that someday every older adult with cancer will be treated by a geriatric oncologist, we should make every effort to offer geriatric training to all healthcare professionals and to create bridges between geriatrics and other medical specialties.”

Health advocate and heart attack survivor Carolyn Thomas on the physiological and emotional response to the fear of dying during a heart attack. Continue reading

3 Tips for Using Social Media to Read Articles More Efficiently

3 Tips for Using Social Media to ReadI’ve been asked how I have time to find and read so many palliative care articles, both in academic journals and the lay press (the type of thing that ends up in Elsewhere in the Palliverse posts). Is my nose constantly pressed up to a screen? Definitely not. Below I will share a few tips on how to read more efficiently using free social media tools and apps. Continue reading

#PCRNV15 Forum

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Thanks to everyone who joined us in person or online today for our presentation at the PCRNV Forum. A special mention must go to James for his great webinar effort! Here is the transcript and analytics for you to enjoy! If you would like to join the Researchers Database, please fill in this Database invitation and send it back to us at Palliverse@gmail.com

Special guest post – Dr Chris Sanderson on #lettertome

Dear readers,

We are honoured to bring you a guest post, in fact two, and indeed we hope more, from the fabulous Dr Chris Sanderson, palliative care physician.  I have to say that I was so inspired by this idea, by putting patients at the centre of our communication, where they should be, that I totally stole this idea for my own Change Day pledge.

Below is part one of her description of her pledge for Change Day, #lettertome.

#lettertome : A twitter campaign to improve how we share information with patients.

Social media is such a wonderful space for spreading ideas – and sometimes the simplest ideas may convey a world of significance. Recently on twitter, there was a conversation between various doctors and patient advocates about how we speak to and about our patients, and the subject of doctors’ letters was raised. Thus was born a new hashtag, a pledge for Change Day Australia, and potentially a new way of doing things.

Continue reading

How to rock the boat without falling out – interested in Change?

For this week’s social media post we visit The Edge and the change and innovation folks from the NHS in the UK. The School for Health and Care Radicals is running a free online course. Here’s what they say about it below…..

Rock the boat and stay in it! Anyone who wants to bring about change has to be ready to break the rules. But in health and social care, that can be really difficult. The art of rocking the boat while staying in it is something it seems no-one is ready to help you learn. That’s where the School for Health and Care Radicals (SHCR) comes in. Brought to you by NHS Improving Quality, the School is entirely based online, is completely free, is backed by the world’s largest health organisation: the UK’s National Health Service (NHS), and is a platform for radicals to learn together, using powerful, guided learning which also qualifies for Continuing Professional Development points*.

The School for Health and Care Radicals is a free, five-week virtual learning programme for change activists in health and care. Five modules Absolutely free 9.30am-11.00am GMT Friday morning online sessions (or catch-up when you’re able) Handbook and study guides Social Guided Learning Use it how you want! If you’ve been frustrated by having to navigate stifling hierarchies to get the changes you know are needed, or criticised for being a dissenter, disruptive or even divisive, then the School for Health and Care Radicals is for you. It’s more than just a school – it’s a platform for learning, and a community of people like you. You can read more about the School on our FAQs page.

See more at: http://www.nhsiq.nhs.uk/9022.aspx#sthash.aphbFb9p.dpuf

I am joining up so I hope to see you there. It’s a good time for south eastern Australia, at 20:30 on a Friday night, but I understand that you can do it at any time. The Edge also publishes an e-newsletter which is free – heaps of interesting and inspiring reading there from thinkers and leaders in health. The Edge makes connections between people worldwide who are interested in transformational change and disruptive innovation in health and care. http://theedge.nhsiq.nhs.uk

Cheers, Sonia

Elsewhere in the Palliverse – social media edition

Social media is a broad term that includes all sorts of online platforms and interactions, from the blogs* I follow (and share) via my RSS reader, to Youtube videos, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, slideshare and beyond.  This week’s “Elsewhere in the Palliverse” visits the intersection of social media, palliative care and research.

*including palliverse.com, of course!

 

Tweets from the afterlife: social networking with the dead – from @ConversationEDU

This is another article from the Death and Dying series on the fantastic website The Conversation. We’ve shared a couple of these articles before and I would recommend reading the rest over at The Conversation.

Tweets from the afterlife: social networking with the dead

By Bjorn Nansen, University of Melbourne; James Meese, University of Melbourne; Martin Gibbs, University of Melbourne; Michael Arnold, University of Melbourne, and Tamara Kohn, University of Melbourne

Media technologies have operated as both a means of communicating news of a death and memorialising the deceased for a significant period of time, moving from traditional epitaphs, eulogies, wakes and inscription in stone to centuries-old obituaries printed and circulated in newspapers. So where are we now? Continue reading

Social media – health care hashtags

Greetings dear readers,

You may have caught up with past posts such as Twitter 101 and Twitter 102.

But, you may ask, how do I know which hashtags will be interesting for me?

Wonder no more. Here is a list from Symplur of healthcare hashtags.

The ones I look at are #HPMglobal (hospice and palliative medicine global), #HPM (you can work that one out), #HCLDR (health care leaders), #HCSMANZ (health care and social media Australia and New Zealand). There are some patient-centred ones I dip into like #BCSM (breast cancer social media) and #LCSM (lung cancer social media).

Continue reading

Elsewhere in the Palliverse – Weekend Reads (featuring zombies)

Here’s some palliative care and research related links to peruse in the week ahead (most found via Twitter):

ABC News interviews Atul Gawande about “modern medicine’s treatment of dying patients.” Dr Gawande is all over social media and the news, even in Australia (and in Legoland)!

Current and former Chairs of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists Mortality Sub-Committee write in The Age about the challenges that not for resuscitation orders can pose for anaesthetists.

The ASCO Post reviews a review article from JAMA Internal Medicine, about end-of-life discussions and advanced care planning. In summary, it’s all good.

In Canada’s Globe & Mail, “End-of-life patients aren’t being heard“.

Geriatrician Louise Aronson writes in The Lancet about ageism in medicine, and ageing as “the human life-cycle’s neglected step-child.”

Presenting at a conference? Improve your presentation with zombie apocalypse principles.

Meanwhile, on October 31st, GeriPal explored the unmet palliative care needs of zombies. And check out the zombie pain scale!

Finally, join the weekly (zombie-free) #hpmglobal tweetchat on Monday (17/11/14 at 11pm AEDT) to discuss an article from BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care about support networks of end-of-life carers. #hpmglobal chat is hosted by Aussie ex-pat Dr Jim Cleary (@jfclearywisc), with participants from several continents. For instruction in how to participate in a tweetchat, see Sonia’s post Twitter 102.

I hope you enjoy these and stay safe from zombies!

 

Elissa

 

updated palliative blogs list from Christian Sinclair at Pallimed

The fabulous Pallimed have updated their list of palliative blogs. Featuring Palliverse!

Or at least, mentioning Palliverse.

Some great blogs here!

http://bit.ly/1EsTeWG

The Palliverse Team