Guest Post – PRR -THE FREEDOM OF FORGIVING

Photo supplied by PRR

I often meet people who cannot forgive. Even after many years they keep telling the same old stories about how they have been treated unjustly or how they have been cheated, deceived, belittled, or hurt.

The reasons for resentment can be many, with feelings of disappointment, anger, and even hatred quite common. We are not perfect, so how can we expect others and our relationships with them to be perfect. That’s how life is, we all make mistakes. That’s how we learn and grow.

Sometimes with the best intentions, we make situations worse – we want to help someone but instead increase their suffering. Often we lack the wisdom to really see what actions are required or to understand when to act and when not to.

When you see your own limitations and faults, then it is easier to understand and accept those of others. You can then forgive and let go.

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Guest Post – Naomi’s Notes – Dinosaur

Photo by Umanoide on Unsplash

One day Rinpoche’s mother invited me to have dinner with the family.   Rinpoche was six, and he loved dinosaurs. He had a collection of various ones and knew all their names.  He was playing with them when I arrived.

When it came time for me to leave, I asked if I could borrow a torch but she didn’t have one.  Rinpoche came to me and insisted on giving me one of his dinosaurs.   “This will help,” he said as he pressed the small green coloured plastic dinosaur into my hand. I took it but was doubtful that it would.  

The night was dark, no moon in the sky or stars. I walked slowly but carefully towards my hut, which was some distance away.  Along the edge of the monastery forest, there was a narrow path lined with trees leading up toward the stupas.  There was a drop of a few meters on either side of the path I followed the line of the trees relying heavily on my memory to guide me.  I came to an area that was unfamiliar beside the stupas it entailed walking down three steps .The darkness seemed to envelop me.  Not sure what to do, I felt the dinosaur in my hand and looked down and to my surprise saw the dinosaur aglow with enough light to show me the path.

I smiled in the dinosaur light at the wisdom of the young Rinpoche.

Guest Post – Naomi’s Notes – Doing Your Best

Photo by Thomas Lipke on Unsplash

It was three weeks before Christmas and she asked me to visit her in Wellington, preferably before Christmas. I was leaving for India the following week and no cheap flights meant it was not possible. I phoned her and told her I would visit when I returned from India.  

Whilst in India, my Teacher got an email saying she had been admitted into hospice.   I was unsure that I would get back in time. However, my Teacher was confident that it would be okay. At least I was in one of the holiest places and attending a prayer festival.  I sponsored some group prayers for her as well as doing my personal prayers for her.

I met the Tibetan family that my friend sponsored. They were very grateful for her kindness and generosity and very sad that my friend was terminally ill.   They requested me to take a beautiful woollen shawl back to New Zealand for her. 

Within a few days of arriving home, I flew to Wellington to see her.  She was out of hospice and back in her own home, being well cared for by one of her sons and her sister.  Upon arrival, I was greeted by a much thinner version of my friend who was still quite mobile due to the loving care of her son and sister.  I stayed two days with her.

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How doctors ask cancer patients about spirituality

Minster interior 2

You are invited to participate in a qualitative research study which focuses on

UNDERSTANDING HOW DOCTORS ASK CANCER PATIENTS ABOUT SPIRITUALITY

The study is open to all doctors who work mainly with cancer patients. We are interested in a wide range of views on this topic. Participation involves a 20-30 minute interview and completion of a short demographic questionnaire either by phone or at a location of your choice within Sydney. All information obtained will be kept strictly confidential. Results will be used to inform the PhD of lead investigator Dr Megan Best, who is working with her supervisors Prof Phyllis Butow and Prof Ian Olver.

If you are interested in participating, please contact Megan Best at mbes2488@uni.sydney.edu.au