Palace of Care – I’ve got a question Doc

Photo by Artur Łuczka on Unsplash

I need to ask you a question about Dad.

Sure, go for it.

You know that Dad missed my wedding last weekend because he was too unwell?

Yeah.

Well, we had planned to have our honeymoon right after the wedding. We’re supposed to take off tomorrow.

How long will you be away for?

Five days, we are due back Wednesday. I’m not sure what to do.

I’m worried about your Dad, and I’m unsure if he will still be alive on Wednesday.

I can postpone my honeymoon, my wife and I can go at some other time, but this is my last chance to be with my Dad.

You’ve made the right choice, we’re going to get your Dad through this and the rest of your family too.

Thanks Doc.

Hey that’s what we’re here for, please take care.

Palace of Care – The End of the Race

Photo by Cedrik Wesche on Unsplash

She had always been a strong lady, throughout her whole life. She may have done things slowly but always in a methodical fashion, and if it was done by her, it was done well. As it was in life, so it was in death.

Anyone else would likely have died a week ago, but she was holding on as she had too much to live for. She worried about her husband, physically he still looked like he had for the past twenty years but his ability to think and remember had started fading years ago. She had looked after him well, and had to increase her efforts since the dementia started to steal him away from her. He was still polite and kindly, but at times he would forget who she was, and would forget who he was too.

She had been told that the grandchildren were on their way back from overseas, she wasn’t able to acknowledge this. She was mostly unconscious, but would occasionally stir when being turned or when fed small spoonfuls of water. This was done with a special teaspoon which had a hollow mesh structure and the handle served as a straw.

The middle grandchild would arrive that evening, and she would do her best to hold on despite apnoeas of up to 15 seconds. The grandchild arrived and required Rapid Antigen Testing before we would let them in, a negative test would mean it was okay. The swab was taken and processed, the timer was set, 15 minutes before the test could be verified. Time drags on when you are waiting for something.

Tick, tock, tick tock.

A negative RAT test allowed the grandchild to reunite with their grandmother.

Phew….

Our patient died six hours after her reunion with her grandchild.

The eldest grandchild was still making their way back from half the world away and arrived 14 hours after our patient’s death.

RIP Strong Little Queen

Palace of Care – Race Against Time

Photo by Shirly Niv Marton on Unsplash

I gently knocked on the door and then poked my head around the corner. I paused briefly before walking in and saw him sitting there holding his wife’s hand. He bent down and talked gently into her ear. They had only been married for 62 years, and had been together as a couple much longer. She had looked after him well according to his daughter, he had always been treated like a king. In recent years Dementia had meant that he had needed more care than ever. His queen kept him in line but as her health deteriorated she could not keep up with him.

She had lived with her daughter, son-in-law and had practically raised their children. The grandchildren were emotionally close to her and had spent six to eight weeks with her over the Christmas break before heading back to their overseas-based lives. Since her cancer diagnosis seven months ago, she had been cared for by her youngest daughter. She had to keep a close eye on her husband, as he was a flight risk. At times he didn’t even recognise her as she had recently lost a lot of weight. He would ask, “Who is the nice old lady?” With a few prompts he could be reorientated to the love of his life.

Continue reading

Palace of Care – The Art of Prognostication

Photo by Arthur Ogleznev on Unsplash

End-stage COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) due to lung damage from smoking had been his problem for the past decade. Lung tissue destroyed by toxic exposure leading to severe shortness of breath. He needed oxygen at all times, and could only at best mobilise short distances. Life had become a struggle, and just when he thought things couldn’t worsen, they did.

He was in really bad shape when he came in on Friday, he was only semi-conscious and could not respond to my questions. His wife and son, who were his main caregivers at home, looked exhausted. He looked terrible, blue lips and tongue, breathing rapidly, short, shallow breaths, with only a small amount of chest movement. I had not seen him so unwell before, which really concerned me.

Using all my clinical skills and experience, I really thought that he was dying, that he would die within the next hours. That he might last only days, and might never fully wake up again. I gently conveyed this news to the family. That I thought this might be the end of his life. They took it well, he had been unwell a long time, and had been close to death many times in the past.

I prepared his medication chart for end of life care. I wanted to cover the five common symptoms that occur at the end of life; pain, breathlessness, nausea, agitation/confusion, respiratory secretions. Anticipatory prescribing for a dying person is done, in order to cover the things that occur commonly during their last hours to days of life. Aiming for comfort more than anything else, we started him on syringe driver medications. This would mean a continuous infusion of symptom control medications to keep him calm and comfortable for whatever time was left. I left that Friday afternoon truly thinking that I would not see my patient alive when I returned after the weekend.

Continue reading

Bedside Lessons – 15. The Elite Soldier Part 1

Photo by Rob Pumphrey on Unsplash

If he had been a veteran of another war he probably would’ve received The Commonwealth countries’ highest military honour for bravery – The Victoria Cross. He had carried his severely injured comrade over his shoulders and had run at double pace in order to ensure that “no man was left behind.” Any other war he would’ve come home a hero, but on his return he was called many names; murderer, child-killer, Imperialist Puppet. He hadn’t served for fame or glory, he had done his job, he had served his country, and had followed orders. He and his fellow soldiers were shunned and he had to hide the specialness of his training, and he learnt how not to talk about sensitive subjects.

It was difficult fitting into a peace-loving society when you had been trained to channel your propensity for violence into your bread and butter work. The aggression still needed an outlet and society was not too receptive of this. He rediscovered football and was able to divert his rage into victorious feats of gallantry. He became a trusted team-mate and was able to translate this into a successful coaching career, allowing his leadership skills to flourish.

His teams did well, and he won many accolades, but the hurt inside continued to need suppressing. He swallowed it deeper and deeper, until he had almost forgotten it, almost. Life had its ups and downs, success on the field, was not always reflected in his significant relationships off the field.

He had received the worst news just prior to being admitted into hospice. As with all the other bad news, he took it like a man. Face to face, without flinching or reacting, there would be time for that later in private. In public he had to represent his team, his unit, he had to be the hardest of weapons. They had told him that he only had three days left to live.

Continue reading

Palace of Care/I think therefore I am? – #getjnrbak – Time is of the essence

 

Since the last update a lot has happened.

The local branch of shipping company Maersk reached out to Palliverse after reading the NZ Herald article from Sunday. Their can do attitude was much appreciated by us all. Thank you very much.

Thanks also to everyone who has made suggestions, offered advice and wished us well for this mission. It is heartening that people are taking time out of their busy lives to try to help their fellow man. Be proud of yourselves.

Poppa has become extremely fatigued over the past three days which is a big concern to the hospice team and the family. There’s a possibility that time may be shortening, as Poppa’s condition continues to deteriorate.

There has been some good news – Junior has been improving everyday and has been in touch with his specialist again. His risk of further eye injury is now estimated to be low, and because of the uncertain situation that Poppa is in the decision has been made for Junior and other family members to board the earliest flight to Auckland tomorrow.

Poppa has been informed of the travel plans and is looking forward to seeing Junior tomorrow. Poppa is trying his best to hold on.

Fingers and everything else remain crossed. Prayers are being said by many people on both sides of the Tasman.

Good luck Poppa and Junior – I sincerely hope that you can have your reunion.