I think therefore I am? – Not On My Watch

Photo by Mikell Darling on Unsplash

It distresses me to hear on the grapevine of how patients, who have chosen to have assisted dying, in other palliative care units have been treated by staff. Following the revelation of their wishes I have heard of staff treating the patient differently. Not wanting to engage with them anymore, giving them the ‘cold shoulder,’ because of the choice they have made. Some staff refuse to attend the patient even if they push the call button when they need help.

It’s called discrimination. Treating people differently because they are different. In these cases because they have chosen something the staff do not support. A difference of opinion leads to stigmatisation and a change in the mindset of the caregiver. This does not fit in with my own care philosophy. I will not abandon someone due to the choices they make not fitting with my own beliefs. I am in my role for the sake of the patient and their family. They are not there for the sake of my existence.

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Harassment in healthcare – What can palliative care learn from the RACS?

As many of you would know the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons has recently released its expert advisory group Draft Report into discrimination, bullying and harassment in surgery.  The results of the report are confronting even if they are unfortunately not altogether surprising.

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