I think therefore I am? – Starts with P and ends with O

Photo by Ray Harrington on Unsplash

It’s important to celebrate the small victories we achieve in palliative care, as they are often hard-won. When the natural history of illness is one of disappointment and loss, it is important to mark the times of success. Our patient had not passed bowel motions for 11 days. With each passing day, she had felt less and less normal. She wondered if she would ever Poo again. When constipation has taken its toll for such a long time the treatments will be accompanied by pain. Not having the treatment will lead to more pain. We had tried the standard treatments of pills, soluble powders, and various products to be squirted in private, all with no success. We readied the special injection. If it worked it work quickly. The injection was provided and we all held our bated breath in concert. Within 20 minutes we had achieved a result. The cheering was heard from the doctors’ office, at the nursing station. Yahoos echoed down our corridor. I felt the urge to perform a cartwheel. Smiles all around at the arrival of the VIP – Vast Incredible Poo – time to celebrate. Fireworks were lit and the Poo party began.

“Ahhhhh. You’d better call the water department, because their pipes may be blocked as I just passed a two-metre-long Grogan!”
This story soon spread throughout our hospice.
The next day I met the patient for the first time, “Ah, you must be Mr Grogan?”

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Elsewhere in the Palliverse – #WHPCDay15 Edition

WHPCD15

Today, 10th October 2015, is World Hospice and Palliative Care Day (#WHPCDay15). This year’s theme, “Hidden Lives, Hidden Patients”, puts the focus on people with palliative care needs who may struggle with access to palliative care, “including children, LGBT individuals, HIV prisoners, soldiers and those living in rural settings.” Below are some recent articles from around the web, drawing attention to some of the “hidden lives” in palliative care.

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