Control & Decision Making

elizabeth

Taken from my hospital room on a good day

I’ve been in hospital for the last three weeks, and have just returned back home (finally!).  It has been both a very difficult physical experience dealing with pain management and a wound, but also a mental journey for me.

 

A lot of what I read about palliative care, and my own experiences as well, have been about control; the control that palliation gives you over the time you, as an individual, have left, rather than the often more passive involvement of care when engaging in active treatment.  Throughout my treatment, I’ve been eager – possibly to my own mental and emotional detriment – to remain highly active with what has been going on.  I make guesses as to what might be causing pain or discomfort or other symptoms, explaining to my doctor what it must mean as he compassionately and respectfully listens to my ideas that I’ve gotten from my half-hearted reading of an abstract from a medical journal.  Continue reading

How does it feel to be young and dying?

ElizabethCAplice

Palliverse welcomes a new contributor today. Elizabeth Caplice is an archivist on hiatus. She has Stage IV colorectal cancer, and writes about cancer, and how it intersects with life, particularly in younger adults. Elizabeth has shared a recent photo, to show that “stage IV cancer looks far broader than just some elderly hands with a cannula in them.” (Try doing a Google image search for “palliative care”.)

We recommend Elizabeth’s excellent blog  Sky Between Branches and her Twitter feed. As always please leave responses in the “Comments” box below.


 

Today, I saw my oncologist, and got dealt more bad news.  Stage IV cancer life is mostly bad news, and you come to expect it.  The cancer has spread, again, after only two weeks off chemotherapy – which I needed to take due to my blood count consistently dropping to dangerous levels.  He gently told me that if it was in my bones now, it wouldn’t be shocking, because I was diagnosed with Stage IV rectal cancer a year and a half ago.  I have done remarkably well.  Continue reading