Bedside Lessons – 4. The Father

Photo by Tim Mossholder on Unsplash

The old Chinese man was admitted with uncontrolled pain and breathing distress. His wife and son doted upon him and were worried about him as he had been rapidly worsening over the past weeks. He had previously had fluid from around his lung drained in hospital the other month, which had helped his breathing. His symptoms were controlled quickly but he still felt exhausted.

Even speaking to him in his native Mandarin Chinese it was difficult to tell what he really wanted. He appeared to know that things were worsening. It was just before New Zealand’s general election, and the End of Life Choice Act 2019 was being considered for enactment via National Referendum. He told me that he had already cast his vote and was in support of having the option of assisted dying. His son quickly told him that even if it was voted in that it could not be accessed until another 12 months.

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Bedside Lessons – 1. The Magyar

Photo by Chandler Cruttenden on Unsplash

When we met, I had just started my second year of specialist training in Palliative Medicine. I was keen to use my new-found skills and knowledge in the hospice inpatient setting. When I assessed him I was sure that I could successfully treat his pain and that I could decrease his suffering. Management plans swirled in my head and I started to offer him strong analgesics in order to cover his severe pain. I talked to him in an excited manner about Morphine, Oxycodone, Methadone, Gabapentin, Nortriptyline, Fentanyl. He was not interested and would only take Paracetamol. Hmm, maybe we’ll try again tomorrow.

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