Sneak Preview from Bedside Lessons – Chapter 54 – Always in Between

Photo by Tien Vu Ngoc on Unsplash

I have lived in-between for most of my life. I grew up between two cultures; the Chinese at home and the Eurocentric outside of my home. Later in University, I was part of the local Chinese Group but felt more comfortable as part of the newer Asian immigrant group.
I have a lot of experience in bridging between two different cultures which are different in many ways and may think they have little in common. Palliative Care lies in between the usual medical culture of active treatment and the culture of death and dying. Was that what attracted me to Palliative Care? Are we there to bridge the gap between cultures?

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I think therefore I am? – The journey begins

The largest health and disability system reforms for a generation will start in Aotearoa New Zealand (ANZ) starting in July of this year. One of the major changes is the creation of an independent Māori Health Authority. Its important task is to address the health inequities and disparities which lead to Māori people dying seven years earlier than other residents of ANZ. It has taken us 182 years to reach this sorrowful state and a real change of mindset is required if anything is to change at all. It can feel almost too big. What can I do to make things better? What difference can I make as an individual when the system has been designed to continue producing the same results? Nothing changes if nothing changes.

During a visit to one of the local marae/meeting place years ago my hospice staff were asked, “What do you have at your hospice that would make Māori feel welcome?” We struggled to answer the question. “Well here is your wero/challenge. How can you make us feel more welcome? Show us some evidence, don’t just talk.”

Thus began our journey of discovery, we needed to be educated. Bi-cultural competency training was arranged for all staff members throughout all levels of our organisation. For both clinical and non-clinical staff. We learnt about the adverse effects of colonisation, and the poison of institutional racism. We are encouraging each other to use more Te Reo Māori words in day to day hospice life. Bilingual signage has been placed as we seek a more open cultural direction.

We are singing Māori waiata/songs together every Wednesday morning. Today we were graced by a special impromptu guest. One of our tangata whenua/Māori inpatients walked into the room where we were singing. She had a big smile on her face as she joined her voice with ours. It was a privilege to be able to sing alongside her for those few minutes.

We have only just begun our journey of discovery but it is making a difference already. Another tangata whenua patient we cared for recently told me, “I started laughing as soon as I walked in. The wairua/spirit of your place felt good. I feel comfortable here. I trust you guys.”

It’s a small step in the right direction. Are you going to join us on the hīkoi/walk?

I think therefore I am? – In-between

Photo by Rohan Reddy on Unsplash

Palliative Care lies in between the usual medical culture of active treatment and the culture of death and dying. Was that what attracted me to Palliative Care, having lived as an in-betweener for most of my life? Growing up between two cultures; Chinese at home and mostly Eurocentric outside of home. This continued for me in University being part of the local Chinese Group but also being part of the newer Asian immigrant group. A bridge is needed between the two groups as the two different cultures can be different in many ways, and may think that they have little in common.

Standard healthcare is directed at saving life, curing disease, fixing things which are broken. Death is looked upon as the great enemy, something to be fought against, railed against until the dying of the light. People have to go to battle against their diseases, go to war, but when it comes to your own bodies the collateral damage may be too much too handle.

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