I think therefore I am? – A walk in the garden

Photo by Kilyan Sockalingum on Unsplash

My fitness tracker died on me a few months ago and since then the wear pattern on my shoes has slowed down. The reminders to do at least 250 steps each hour were a good reminder to stay active during the day. I have the luxury of working in a place with a garden surrounding it. A few times a day I can go out for a quick walk around the garden. One orbit is 500 steps, which would add to my daily step count. 10000 steps a day was more than achievable. The fitness tracker wasn’t mine, but one I had inherited from a family member, but I wore it out.

A few minutes of self-care interspersed within busy days. The simple act of walking in some nature. The sunlight on my face, the breezes through my hair. The sounds of the insects and birds doing their thing in the trees. The wind winds its way through many thousands of leaves. Not quite a forest to bathe in but in certain parts of the garden, you can stop under a tree and imagine that you are in much deeper woods. A momentary escape from the hustle and bustle of the workplace, I am briefly transported thousands of kilometres away. The fresh air is scented with the products of the plants themselves. It’s as if I am a time traveller, going back to the wellness retreat I attended three years ago, but I am not the same person anymore. Three years older and hopefully wiser.

I return to my office and the ward feeling refreshed. These micro-breaks throughout the day help to keep things calm.

Palace of Care – Micro-breaks

Photo by Clay Banks on Unsplash

In Palliative Care practice I often have emotionally loaded conversations. Tough talks about death and dying are commonplace. Emotions may flow in a raw state and tears may be involved. Sometimes you are confirming people’s greatest fears. They will not be recovering, they will become more unwell, and they will die. The emotional hit can be hard and the energy is felt by the recipient as well as the provider of the information.

Human emotions can be messy and the levels of distress can be high. When in the clinical moment I have to hold it all together, to stay calm as I guide them through the rough waters. I allow the emotions to flow, to be felt as they cannot be denied. Preparing someone for their imminent death can be some of the toughest work I do and some of the most important work I do. I don’t want anyone to have any surprises, they need to know what they are dealing with. The information will be shared in a kind and gentle fashion, but some ideas and concepts hurt when they are heard. The treatment of someone’s existential distress is beyond the effects of any of the medications I prescribe.

After conversations with high emotional stakes, I will call for a break. I will remove myself and my team from the patient room and will leave the inpatient unit itself. We walk upstairs and have a drink in the staff room. We remove ourselves from the fray, even if it is for five minutes. A micro-break is had. Our bodies and minds are taken away from the physical environment where heightened emotions were experienced. We nourish our bodies with some food and drink and take some time out. If possible, we also go out onto the deck to have some fresh air and sunshine.

Soon enough we will be back downstairs to deal with the next case. The short break allows us to be present for the next conversation with our next patient.