Living with grief & loss: #PallANZ chat

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Grief and loss is something we will all face at different times throughout our lives. Whether it is the death of our pets, our friends, our children, siblings or parents; the experience and expression of grief in response to these losses can be a very personal and individual thing. Grief can also arise in anticipation of loss. For those living with life-limiting illness, living with the loss of social role and professional identity can be especially challenging.

Thoughts about old, new and future losses can be particularly common during the festive season. For some of us, it may represent an anniversary of the death of a loved one, and bring with it painful memories of loss. Some might be facing their first Christmas ‘alone’, while others may be grappling with the possibility of celebrating their ‘last Christmas’.

While living with grief and loss is a personal experience, we don’t have to endure it on our own. As a community, there are many ways that we can support each other. Join Palliverse and Palliative Care Australia CEO Liz Callaghan (@PCACEO) to reflect on 2016 and talk about grief and loss.

Carers and people with palliative care needs are especially welcome, as are health professionals, researchers, policymakers and interested community members!

If you are new to twitter and tweet chats, see our “idiot’s guide” here: https://palliverse.com/2014/09/03/idiots-guide-to-twitter-for-health-professionals-twitter-101/

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Drugs for #delirium don’t work, and may in fact harm

Meera Agar, University of Technology Sydney

Delirium robs dying people of their autonomy, dignity and last conversations with loved ones, at a time when every moment is precious.

Symptoms are highly distressing to experience and watch. Confusion, incoherent communication, poor attention, agitation, drowsiness and hallucinations are some markers of this common complication for people dying in hospital from cancer and other advanced illnesses. On average one in three people in end-of-life hospital care are affected.

Doctors commonly prescribe antipsychotic medications to try to relieve these symptoms. However, our study just published in JAMA Internal Medicine, raises serious concerns about their safety and efficacy.

So, what are we to do for people experiencing delirium, who are robbed of their mental awareness and ability to communicate?

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“Failure to maintain”: do hospitals cause suffering in older people?

Today Palliverse talks to Assistant Professor Kasia Bail (@Kasia_Bail) from the University of Canberra. Kasia is a nurse, a researcher, a kung fu instructor and a drummer in a metal band. She came to our attention via social media when we noticed her crowdfunding campaign for the next stage of her research into nursing care of complex, hospitalised older people. Here at Palliverse we are fans of crowdfunding, although we’re yet to use it for research purposes!

Kasia’s research aims to improve sustainable acute care health delivery for an ageing population, while her clinical experience includes general medical and acute palliative care. In her PhD, Kasia developed an approach to measure nurse-sensitive outcomes, which is currently being used to evaluate a Government-funded implementation of a cognitive identifier. Kasia has a passion for identifying and researching the structures and processes which impede or enable quality patient care, and sharing her learning and inquiry with nursing students, industry and professional groups. Here, Palliverse asks her about her latest research project and dipping her toe into the world of social media.

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Dr Kasia Bail (image via Dr Bail)

Your research has led to a new concept in the care of older people with complex medical problems, “Failure to Maintain”. What does this mean? Continue reading

free Australian webinars on advance care planning and palliative care

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Decision Assist is running a series of free webinars on advance care planning and palliative care.

For those of you new to webinars, you can watch the presentation live on the internet and interact with the presenters, or just watch the presentation later. Some health services and aged care facilities are watching them together as part of their continuing professional development or education programs.

Here is a link to register. The next one is presented by Ilsa Hampton, CEO, Meaningful Ageing Australia

Decision Assist Aged Care Webinar Series – Grief, trauma and loss
Tuesday 6 December 2016 | 1.30 pm – 2.15 pm AEDT

http://www.webcasts.com.au/decisionassist061216/

Regards, Sonia (who also works for Decision Assist!)

 

the death talker

We all struggle to live a good life but what about a good death? Can we ever be truly prepared for the inevitable?

Molly Carlile is a ‘death talker’ who is committed to helping Australians ‘die well’. She talks about physician-assisted dying, planning for death, and the need for a cultural shift in the way we think about death and dying.

Here is a link from the ABCs Radio National to an interview with Molly Carlile, palliative care activist and author.