What does a successful (US) palliative care program look like?

A little different from that found in Australia or New Zealand. 28097_PEC_Palliative_Care_Poster

Here are some ideas which might have resonance in our region.

I love the idea of automatic triggers to referral, which takes away the emotional content for the referrer of whether to refer or not. But our electronic medical record systems lag a long way behind that seen in the US, which is problematic.

I am not sure what I think about the suggested re-brand to “supportive care”. Less threatening for some patients and referrers, for sure. Does it mean we are joining the ranks of the death deniers, though?
Excellent reminder about the importance of meticulous communication with referrers. However I suggest that an item missing is laser focus on communication with patients. As patients sit at the centre of our care, I often write the letter to the patient in non medical language, and copy in the referrer and general practitioner. The letters may be light on medical detail for some referrers, but the patients often find them useful to remind them of what we talked about, and to show family, friends and other care givers.

I liked the data down the bottom about readmission rates, that would be a powerful lever for our managers to promote palliative care consultation services. Patients seen by palliative care had dramatically lower readmission rates compared with those not seen.

I would love to see an infographic about our palliative care services data, if you have seen one please let me know!28097_PEC_Palliative_Care_Poster

Sonia

#COSA17: #PalliativeCare reflections on the 44th Clinical Oncology Society of Australia Annual Scientific Meeting

Circular Quay

Despite being a Melburnian, I must admit that Sydney really is an irresistibly beautiful city when the sun comes out, especially by the water. The 44th Clinical Oncology Society of Australia (COSA) Annual Scientific Meeting was held in the newly renovated International Convention Centre in Sydney between 12-15th November 2017. With the sunlight streaming in through its many windows, reflecting off the waters of Darling Harbour, it really was the perfect place to be at the beginning of summer.

I attended the pre-conference workshop on cancer supportive care, which was organised by Judith Lacey, a palliative medicine specialist at Chris O’Brien LIfehouse. The whole-day workshop featured an interesting mixture of passionate speakers promoting a range of complementary treatments including medicinal cannabis, massage and probiotics; alongside others examining the evidence base for acupuncture, reviewing current clinical trials and prescribing pathways, and comparing different funding models for supportive care. It was a long but worthwhile day that set the mood for the rest of the conference.  Continue reading

New Zealand wins (again)

I have to confess I am a fan of the New Zealand health system from across the ditch. Sensible spending. strong palliative care health service connections… am I wrong Bro?

This article has not succeeded in reversing my bias in favour of New Zealand.

Palliative data nerds will no doubt recall this  fascinating study in Scotland by Professor Clark et al.  Published in Palliative Medicine, and quickly attaining the journal’s highest-ever Altmetrics score (1) , Clark showed that among 10,743 inpatients in 25 Scottish teaching and general hospitals on 31 March 2010,  3,098 (28.8%) patients died during the one-year follow-up period. The findings were replicated in 2013 with similar results.

The study by the fabulous  Professor  Merryn Gott et al showed that on the same date, the corresponding figure in New Zealand (including obstetrics) was about half at 14.5%. Patients at higher risk of dying were the elderly of over 80 years of age, Maori, those with cancer, those from socially disadvantaged backgrounds, and those admitted under medical specialties rather than surgical.

New Zealand seems to provide better end of life care outside the hospital setting, with stronger end-of-life care in the aged care setting. This has certainly been a focus for service development in Australia as well.

How would we rate in Australia I wonder?

I would love to hear from international colleagues

Ref (1)  https://www.gla.ac.uk/research/az/endoflifestudies/projects/imminence/

Sonia

I think therefore I am ? – A special Totara Hospice South Auckland event this Friday.

07/12/17 – Update – Attendees please note that tomorrow morning in Auckland there will be a Railway Workers Strike meaning that road traffic will likely be much heavier than usual. We have asked attendees to arrive at 8.45am for a 9am start, please factor in the strike traffic delay when planning your travel for tomorrow morning. If you arrive early you can visit our on-site Cafe Totara for a fresh Barista-made coffee, with a range of fresh food available as well, all prepared on-site. An email update will be sent to attendees who have already registered.

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Hi everyone,

Can healing occur at the end of life?

To whom does compassion need to extend to at the end of life?

These are the type of questions that will be explored in Totara Hospice South Auckland’s education centre this Friday morning, 08 December 2017 9am to 12pm.

We are privileged to be hosting two international speakers.

Dr Rob Rutledge will be joined by a special guest.

We will be honoured to also have in attendance, Tibetan Buddhist Monk, Za Choeje Rinpoche.

zach

Please join us for a very special interactive workshop in which we will attempt to challenge your thinking and change the stasis quo.

RSVP details are contained in the below pdf.

Morning tea refreshments will be provided.

Please pass on this invitation to anyone in your networks who might be interested in attending.

Cheers,

James

Invitation Compassion and Healing Seminar.pdf