Palliverse researcher hub

It’s well known that research can be a demanding and sometimes lonely road, particularly for those new to the discipline. Early career researchers often have to build networks, lead projects, write applications to funders and ethics committees, liaise with project stakeholders, analyse data and present findings, all while building networks and managing a precarious career pathway with little security. Support and skill-sharing is critical during this process. The Palliverse researcher hub was formed in 2016, following a discussion between some of our crew at a conference. The idea was a regular, informal get-together for post-grad and early career palliative care researchers, to discuss aspects of our projects, seek advice and share experiences. We meet bi-monthly for around an hour, and keep a relatively open agenda, to aim for the kind of reflective discussion you don’t always get at departmental seminars or CPD sessions. We’ve started small, and now are ready to branch out a little. If you are a palliative care researcher working in Australia or New Zealand, and think you’d like to join our group, please get in touch with us by emailing craig.sinclair@uwa.edu.au. Happy researching!

Life in a hospice – reflections on caring for the dying

We have had an email from the Palliverse – Ann Richardson has kindly made her book “Life in a hospice” available as an e book. Life in a Hospice: reflections on caring for the dying is based on very honest interviews with a variety of hospice staff in England, talking anonymously about the joys and challenges of their work and its impact on their lives.

See below for her email. Let us know if you have read it! Thanks Ann for letting us know

Sonia Continue reading

Pallimed article on heart failure palliative care trial

Thanks to Dr Drew Rosielle for this thoughtful analysis of an important trial, comparing usual care to usual care plus palliative care in ambulatory heart failure patients.

http://www.pallimed.org/2017/07/palliative-care-chf-pal-hf-trial.html

Headline – palliative care improved quality of life. So this article is adding to the literature supporting this idea, which mostly occurs in the malignant domain.

Check out Pallimed if you have time, it’s got great stuff!

Enjoy!

Sonia

 

You can’t always get what you want…

An excellent post from a person who knows about the old battle metaphor for cancer. Cancer is not a failure of will or morals.
Thank you CM!

The Fairytale and the Abyss

Some of you may have seen 60 Minutes on Sunday evening. It featured the story of ‘Patient 71″, a woman named Julie Randall who was diagnosed aged 50 with metastatic melanoma. She found a place on a US clinical trial and is now in excellent health. There is much that is great about her story. She was very much her own advocate and aggressively sought out treatment options. But the rhetoric around the story was less than great.

The 60 Minutes Story ran a very strong line that Julie refused to die and leave her teenage children. As if it is really a choice. I now know far too many mothers and fathers who have died leaving children much younger than Julie’s. Not one of them wanted to leave their children. I suppose I shouldn’t expect much more of 60 Minutes than the trite and cliched. And yet it annoyed…

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